White Chojubai

ochong

Seedling
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This is one of 11 plants (7 Chaenomeles) I picked up from Evergreen Gardenworks this spring. It's grown well and did great with a repot a couple of months back and has just flowered on the old wood from the cutting. This seems late in the year as I thought quince tend to flower in late winter, but my toyo nishiki put out 2 flowers in July and the orange delight i have will flower in the next few weeks.

My question is, could I take cuttings from it (and the others) at this time of year and get them rooted indoors in a humidity tray with a heated mat under? I don't have grow lights, but i have a bay window that gets a fair amount of direct sunlight. Or, would it be better to wait for spring at this point? (First frost here is Oct 1 and last frost May 10.)

Ultimately, I'd like to try a clump out of cuttings and keep this established one as a single trunk.

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Ohmy222

Shohin
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I would wait until spring. I have never tried to root a white chojubai but the red ones are very easy from cuttings. My concern is your location doesn't leave you much time. I know you said you would do it indoors but then you would have to get them back outside when it is getting cold.
 

Paradox

Imperial Masterpiece
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Damn I guess I'm the only one that didn't get the chojubai I ordered from him because he delayed my order because the ume I also ordered weren't ready then the crop failed
 

JEads

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As far as cuttings on chojubai go, I would wait until next spring. We get the highest success between march and june here. By February they are leafing out in our climate. So just wait till they start leafing out, and then you should be good to do cuttings.
They work best with light misting and 75deg F heat pad underneath. They will often lose their leaves right off the bat, but do not give up on them.
Once they root out, they are strong growers.
 
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Having successfully rooted a good deal of reds this and last year I’d say why not? You have plenty of potential material.

Better still, after looking closely at your set up, why dont you just do a number of in ground layers? The easiest and surest way would be to slip pot the quince in one of the larger ovals you have, or even an old dishpan with holes drilled in it. Lightly wire the branches around to a suitable area and layer away. By mid spring 22 you should be good to go with at least three new quinces.

Actually I just did two last week!

cheers
DSD sends
 

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