White Mould good or bad?

RamboLoops

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Hi all, new here. I got my first bonsai. It was stored in an outdoor greenhouse but is an indoor plant. I took it home, put it in place (window with natural light) but the following day i noticed this on the soil. Is this an issue for the plant? Or just symbiotic with the soil and tree?
 

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sorce

Nonsense Rascal
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Seems to be on the fert. Normal.

But U's in words that ain't supposed to have U's...
Ahem.

Lol... @RamboLoops there is a spot in one, "hey John, got any ideas?" "Yeah, Fuck em."
We must have played that 100 times over!

And that's when rewind spun a tape!

Sorce
 

Paradox

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Hi all, new here. I got my first bonsai. It was stored in an outdoor greenhouse but is an indoor plant. I took it home, put it in place (window with natural light) but the following day i noticed this on the soil. Is this an issue for the plant? Or just symbiotic with the soil and tree?

What kind of tree is this?
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Elms have myc, just like any other tree.
This seems to be just regular fungus munching on poop. Fungus looking for new food - and given the right conditions - will produce that fluffy white stuff; it's branching out trying to colonize more crap. First step of organic nutrient release, perfectly normal.

If bears crap in the woods, it'll look like this after a little rain.
 

LanceMac10

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DSC02506.JPG

.....looks like it's time for a re-pot if this is a tropical plant.....mold is "fine" but the soil looks like it's solid....
 

HorseloverFat

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Organic soil, indoors, only one angle of light and no air movement will cause this...

Also.. Parvifolias are Zone 4...

Where are you located?
 

Yo Mango

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Make sure you have good drainage, air flow, and sunlight.
 

RKMcGinnis

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Mycorrhiza fungus and bacteria will be growing in the soil with the roots. That looks like it’s feeding on the top soil and not making an exchange of nutrients with the roots. There are parasitic fungi and bacteria as well and isn’t easy to tell apart from the mycorrhizal. But most the time white filaments is a good sign. I’ve seen honey fungus kill trees in the backyard in a year noticing honey mushrooms growing off exposed roots.
I had what you are looking at in an indoor tree before and scooped out the top soil added some myco bacteria and fungus with a fan set low and it never happened again. It’s probably a perfect mycro climate for that stuff to grow on the top soil. Probably not good circulation.
 

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