White Pine Stock

Gandalph

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Hi All~

I acquired this small white pine stock from a local nursery here am am trying to grow it out. Problem is, due to the soil and the weather the needles are turning a bit yellow. The tree is constantly borderline wet (nursery standard mix) and it has been extremely hot here I would like to put it in a more free draining mix so can I ask for some direction as to when to do this (sooner the better) and what would be a good mix for it?
Thanks in advance.







 

Tachigi

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Re-potting now would be very risky...especially since it is in a weakened state. So..... I would dig a hole drop your tree into it and let mother nature tend to it till spring of next year. Then hopefully it will be a bit healthier and able to handle the stress of re-potting.

Placing the tree in a hole will hopefully regulate moisture and temperature in the root zone which in turn should make the tree healthier....don't feel obligated to yank your tree next spring for the sake of potting it. If it isn't healthy then re-potting may not be the right thing to do. Think of whats best for the tree first and your desires second.

Just my thoughts
 

Gandalph

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Thanks for the reply Tom. I had rolled that around in my head but could not decide what to do about the density of the soil in this pot, and also around the roots. It is obviously struggling with the wetness.

Would you recommend pulling the tree out of the pot, breaking away some of the old soil, and putting free draining soil in the hole or just place the tree, pot and all in.

Thanks
 

plant_dr

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Did the nursery tell you this was a white pine??! :eek: The needles aren't grouped into fascicles as a pine tree would have. White Pines usually have 5 needles per bunch. The needles on this are placed single-ly along the branches instead of groups. I'd vote that it is a Douglas fir.

Either way, I'd get it planted in the ground without disturbing the roots too much. Maybe rough them up a tiny bit, but don't lose too much soil. Fill in the hole with a well-draining medium such as a tree and shrub mix with some inorganic matter mixed as well. Water it once thouroughly to get it settled in at first but don't water too much afterward.

Keep it in the ground for a few years to recover and let it gain some trunk size. After that point the rest is up to you for training, etc.!

Good Luck!
Zach
 

Tachigi

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What Zach said... He is right on all accounts...except, I'd have to agree with G, to me it does look more Spruce like than Fir...needles are a bit to pointy to be a fir
 

plant_dr

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The best way to find out would be to test the stiffness of the needles and we can't do that from pictures. Gandaph, if you could tell us whether the needles are fairly soft and flexible or sharp and stiff we can ID it for you. Then we'll be able to tell you even better what to do with it in the years to come.
Best regards,
Zach
 
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Gandalph

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The best way to find out would be to test the stiffness of the needles and we can't do that from pictures. Gandaph, if you could tell us whether the needles are fairly soft and flexible or sharp and stiff we can ID it for you. Then we'll be able to tell you even better what to do with it in the years to come.
Best regards,
Zach

The needles are flat and don't roll easily in between the fingers. I guess it's a fir, and you guessed Douglas. I am supposing that is what it is.

Thanks for the responses all.
 

rockm

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Given your location, the needle shape and the source, I'd think Alberta spruce...Much more common east of the Mississippi in nurseries than Doug Fir.
 

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