Who likes big trees? They are definitely not easy to collect.

mattspiniken

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This is the biggest tree that I have collected yet. I have found that digging the tree is often the easy part but getting it back to the truck is by far the hardest part at times. This one was on a steep slope that is difficult enough to walk on without a tree in tow. A friend helped on this and we really needed a third guy but managed it after a lot of grunts and sweat along with a few falls.

I think I appreciate the tree more than I would have if it was an easy collection but I am not rushing out to collect another monster. Although I do love big trees and I think White Cedars are best as large trees because it helps to scale in the foliage.

Below are some tips that have worked for me collecting White Cedar:

1. Soaking the root ball overnight on the day of collection helps
2. Try and remove a majority of the field soil but not all (more than other conifers)
3. You need to collect enough root (leave the tree if you don't think you can get alot of roots)
4. Put the collected tree in as small as a box as you can with lots of drainage and cover surface with sphagnum. It should be hard to squeeze into the box and not "roomy"

Thoughts? Ideas on how to not screw up this tree? 😂



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mattspiniken

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That one's a beast! The taper is fantastic, too. I gotta ask... did you just collect this?
Yes, I collect White Cedar around bud break in the spring and again around the first week of Sept depending on the weather. I have not lost one September collected White Cedar yet but I have lost a number of spring collected trees... interesting.
 

Dav4

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Yes, I collect White Cedar around bud break in the spring and again around the first week of Sept depending on the weather. I have not lost one September collected White Cedar yet but I have lost a number of spring collected trees... interesting.
Any specific overwintering protocol for September collected cedars, or do you just leave them outside to get covered up in the snow?
 

mattspiniken

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Any specific overwintering protocol for September collected cedars, or do you just leave them outside to get covered up in the snow?
I have a number of large boxes that are covered in 1/4'' hardware cloth I put the trees in there for protection from heavy snow and critters. The box is on the ground and inside I mulch with a very heavy amount of mulch up to nearly the first branch on most trees. No issues yet with this method, I also use heat cord for the fall collected guys but I purposely stop using that around mid November.
 

BunjaeKorea

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Excellent this is going to be well worth the effort. Out of interest please tell us what's in you collecting tool kit.
 

mattspiniken

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Excellent this is going to be well worth the effort. Out of interest please tell us what's in you collecting tool kit.
Thanks, i should mention. I trekked down 4 separate trips with a large watering can to really saturate the roots before collection.

In my collecting “tool kit” is a large heavy duty trenching shovel, multiple sharp root saws, burlap, twine, spray bottle, pruners.
 

BunjaeKorea

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Thanks, i should mention. I trekked down 4 separate trips with a large watering can to really saturate the roots before collection.

In my collecting “tool kit” is a large heavy duty trenching shovel, multiple sharp root saws, burlap, twine, spray bottle, pruners.
Excellent I have followe you on Instagram too
 

mattspiniken

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Nice tree. And yeah, me likes them big too. But I avoid some backbreaking monsters. This might have been over my limit.
The problem is, when I sit this in my garden next to my other trees it makes me want to collect more big trees to go along with it. I think the base is in the 10-12'' range which really makes some of my trees look like babies haha
 

Stan Kengai

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That's some top-notch, grade A, primo, superb material, said Mr. Redundant guy man dude. Seriously some of the best I've ever seen. Good luck with it and be sure to keep us posted on its progress.
 

mattspiniken

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That's some top-notch, grade A, primo, superb material, said Mr. Redundant guy man dude. Seriously some of the best I've ever seen. Good luck with it and be sure to keep us posted on its progress.
Why thank you very much Mr. Redundant guy man dude....haha!!! I will make sure to update as I go.
 

0soyoung

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I too would fear screwing this up, it is so sweet. My advice for not screwing it up is to get in touch with @amkhalid (who is a pro in Toronto). Years ago he showed a yamadori of the same species that he turned into one of my all-time favorite bonsai. The pix of the raw material he posted looked hopeless, unlike yours that looks like a masterpiece in the making = very frightening (e.g., eek, there are so many ways to screw it up - yikes). It is a career making tree, IMHO.


... but what do I know. I'm just a critic and not an artist. 🤔
 

mattspiniken

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I too would fear screwing this up, it is so sweet. My advice for not screwing it up is to get in touch with @amkhalid (who is a pro in Toronto). Years ago he showed a yamadori of the same species that he turned into one of my all-time favorite bonsai. The pix of the raw material he posted looked hopeless, unlike yours that looks like a masterpiece in the making = very frightening (e.g., eek, there are so many ways to screw it up - yikes). It is a career making tree, IMHO.


... but what do I know. I'm just a critic and not an artist. 🤔
No pressure yikes haha! Actually @amkhalid has helped me in the past with after care for collected Cedars. He pointed me in a good direction. He actually gave me some tips on this tree which I have plans to show at the National show next September. Collected in early 16’.
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