Whos trees?

mike108

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Well saw these guys on google and was wondering who they belonged to.
I am guessing japanese but im not sure.

 

painter

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i too stand in the depressed catagory , make s my trees look like doo doo.
 
T

tinhorse

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WoW...this thread brought my out of my lurking status......
 

mike108

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Yeah i figured they were japanese... But we should not feel that way about our trees just becuase our trees arent to that standard is not entirely our fault we have not had the art in the united states for as much time as japan.
 

plant_dr

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Maybe it's just me, but I don't like the nebari on those. It doesn't look natural to me, except sometimes for trees that grow between the sidewalk and the street, when the roots get run over by lawmowers alot. Those aren't very natural either, actually:rolleyes:
 

milehigh_7

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Maybe it's just me, but I don't like the nebari on those. It doesn't look natural to me, except sometimes for trees that grow between the sidewalk and the street, when the roots get run over by lawmowers alot. Those aren't very natural either, actually:rolleyes:

:eek:*gasp*
 

rockm

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"Maybe it's just me, but I don't like the nebari on those. It doesn't look natural to me, except sometimes for trees that grow between the sidewalk and the street, when the roots get run over by lawmowers alot. Those aren't very natural either, actually"

To each his own...but, Jeez, the nebari on these is VERY natural looking to me anyway...I've seen many many old trees with spreading nebari like this, from oaks to maples...
 

plant_dr

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*shrugs* Sorry, they just don't do it for me. The nebari is just too excessive for my taste.
 

Tachigi

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Maybe it's just me, but I don't like the nebari on those. It doesn't look natural to me, except sometimes for trees that grow between the sidewalk and the street, when the roots get run over by lawmowers alot. Those aren't very natural either, actually:rolleyes:

:confused:

That nebari that doesn't float your boat is what all the literature and discussion on root pruning is about. This is the type of nebari we all are striving for.
 
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It's not so shocking if one hasn't been exposed to it... take some of Daniel's trees... people often see them as unnatural, when in fact they are not even as twisted- riddled with holes - or delaminated as nature often makes them in hostile enviornments. So I would imagine that Zach hasn't been around a lot of huge old growth deciduous trees.

Dan tells a story of when he went to Italy to do a demo... way back in the day... he brought (when you could still do that sort of thing) a 5 trunk redwood clump, I believe. He styled it into a pretty cool tree... but since they had never seen anything like that, they couldn't connect with it, and they just found the whole thing odd.

Kindest regards,

Victrinia
 

Brian Van Fleet

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*shrugs* Sorry, they just don't do it for me. The nebari is just too excessive for my taste.

If you work at it long enough and your trees start to look like this and you still don't like it...just send them to me :D
 

rockm

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What's "natural" is a relative thing. The flat top style bald cypress is completely alien to most folks who have never been where the tree grows in the wild.

However, the nebari on these maples is a pretty universal trait of old growth deciduous trees in temperate and even in subtropical and tropical trees:

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/126/385556218_45e4dcf2e7.jpg
 

Attila Soos

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What's "natural" is a relative thing. The flat top style bald cypress is completely alien to most folks who have never been where the tree grows in the wild.

However, the nebari on these maples is a pretty universal trait of old growth deciduous trees in temperate and even in subtropical and tropical trees:

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/126/385556218_45e4dcf2e7.jpg

Those maples are very natural-looking, for conditions where the tree has a shallow root-system and the tree is old. Usually, a moist climate is a requirement for a tree to have shallow spreading roots, forming a massive nebari.

However, for a tree with a deep tap-root, growing in a dry climate, this type of nebari would be unnatural. But, of course, we all know this.

Another thing: usually trees revelop these spreading roots when they have massive trunks - it makes sense, since massive trunks require massive roots to support them. A maple tree, which is on the small-ish side, as far as trees go, would not usually develop such a massive nebari in nature. But few peaple care abut botanical accuracy, specific to the species. Who cares, if we exaggerate for the sake of fun...:). It is also true, that these Japanese-grown bonsai have the nebari we can see because they are very old. As your bonsai gets older and older, in a wide and shallow pot, the nebari will get wider and wider, and there is nothing you can do, to stop it. Given enough time, all our deciduous bonsai with nice and radial roots will look like this. Again, there is nothing you can do, to keep your nebari from ever widening, in spite of being a fan of narrow root-base.

So, for those who like the small nebari, admire your stick-in-the-pot while it lasts :).

And for those who are trying to create such a nebari in field-grown stock, make sure to water often. If you do that, the roots don't have to grow straight down, in search of moisture, and they can just spread in a shallow pattern.
 
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What's "natural" is a relative thing. The flat top style bald cypress is completely alien to most folks who have never been where the tree grows in the wild.

However, the nebari on these maples is a pretty universal trait of old growth deciduous trees in temperate and even in subtropical and tropical trees:

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/126/385556218_45e4dcf2e7.jpg

Dear one...

Have you been to Utah? Or WA? We don't have trees like that. If the tree is a mammoth... it's a conifer. Deciduous trees like maples can get large here, but they tend to tower, so their roots don't really flare across the surface, they go deep. Extreme basal flare like that would be unusual in the NW... and likely non-exisistent in Utah where I am not sure they even have trees.....

(Just kiddin... I've been to Utah and know they have trees. ;))

V
 
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Mind you... I think basal flare like that is sexy as all get out. :D Whether or not it's something you'd find out this way. lol

V
 

Smoke

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Dear one...

Have you been to Utah? Or WA? We don't have trees like that. If the tree is a mammoth... it's a conifer. Deciduous trees like maples can get large here, but they tend to tower, so their roots don't really flare across the surface, they go deep. Extreme basal flare like that would be unusual in the NW... and likely non-exisistent in Utah where I am not sure they even have trees.....

(Just kiddin... I've been to Utah and know they have trees. ;))

V

You gonna make me drive all the way to Washington State to proove you wrong? I bet you drive thru some old neighborhoods and shopping centers and you will see one or two. I would stake my reputation on it;)

I am taken a back when statements like these ar made. It is open to making oneself look pretty foolish. If even one photo from the state is shown to have a spreading root formation above ground it makes the above statement moot...so why say it? "We don't have trees like that"....is that a general statement, a fact or are we just making conversation? Have you traveled every inch of the state and indeed know that no trees exist with spreading Old Mister Crow oil slick nebari's?


If the post had said trees like this are not very common here because ....blah blah, blah.. then you retain credibility.

I will wait and see what we get as a few trees from the PNW with spreading nebari's. Hoping for a few sidewalk busters...those are always fun.
 
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My friend...

I would love to see a deciduous tree with a basal flare 1/2-2/3 the width of the canopy... If someone shows differently, I'll only be thrilled, because then I'll want to go see it. I own a book that points out the location of every significant tree in the Seattle area actually... and has photos of pretty much all of them... I'll have to read it again to make sure I have not missed something.

I was not attempting to be shocking or foolish, I was making a point about visual experiance and the limitations it often imposes on us.

I was also not aware my credibility was on shakey ground. I'll be more careful with it in the future. :p

However to satisfy the moment, I will say that of course there is the wild chance that you could find a deciduous tree in WA with basal flare 1/2-2/3 the width of the canopy. Though for all of that, in re-reading my comment to Mark, I fail to see what's so sensational about it... Only one sentance says anything declarative and is quantified by commenting how unusual it would be here, and what the tendancy is for our larger deciduous trees....

I should have said, "My own visual experiance and research leads me to believe with conviction that we don't have trees like that here."

Is that better? I certainly hope I have made steps to repair my credibility with my public retraction. Let me know if I should go further, or if I am missing the point.

Your friend in all things,


Victrinia
 

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