Why Not Take Olive Me . . .

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Location
Santa Cruz, CA
USDA Zone
9b
#25
I read Olives are very tolerant of root reduction; up to 90% removal will survive. I have just begun with one small tree; the result was much finer shoots, shorter internodes and smaller leaves. I watered and misted it a ton, although I'm not sure that was necessary. I bet this one will survive, please continue to update
 
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Central Coast, California
USDA Zone
9b
#26
. . . up to 90% removal will survive . . . I bet this one will survive, please continue to update
I hope so! As evidenced by the photo showing the escaped root, just taking this home from the nursery was a 90% root reduction whether I liked it or not (there were almost no roots in the #15 pot aside from the giant one exiting the bottom) - I had no choice. At that point . . . well, in for a penny; in for a pound!

I have a couple of smaller olives and have really enjoyed them; I even thread grafted one this summer. If these big-uns survive my initial torturings, they will probably get their own threads. The first one is pushing buds and new white roots already (I couldn't resist peeking) . . .
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
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Location
Berwyn, Il
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6.2
#27
Oh it should live......

And it will.

This could make an outstanding clump.
Everything is so in order already.

Man. F.

Sorce
 
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Location
Alameda, CA
USDA Zone
10a
#28
I hope so! As evidenced by the photo showing the escaped root, just taking this home from the nursery was a 90% root reduction whether I liked it or not (there were almost no roots in the #15 pot aside from the giant one exiting the bottom) - I had no choice. At that point . . . well, in for a penny; in for a pound!

I have a couple of smaller olives and have really enjoyed them; I even thread grafted one this summer. If these big-uns survive my initial torturings, they will probably get their own threads. The first one is pushing buds and new white roots already (I couldn't resist peeking) . . .

I've rooted limb cuttings as thick as my arm...one of the great advantages of olives. Take advantage of it to start right off with a great base. You should be fine. You could screw on a piece of plywood to the bottom to force new roots to grow out instead of down.

Brian
 
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Location
Costa Blanca, Spain, zone 10b
USDA Zone
10b
#36
Very nice Olives and I missed this thread before, I think it was before my time but it is great to see the progression.

Oh and I wonder if the thread title is the same reason I called my thread "Olive Me", if so then kudos for the reference and if not then at least it is the same song.
 
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Location
Beirut Lebanon
#37
View attachment 113757

I'm debating a repot too, as I expect warm weather for the foreseeable future . . .
can you please elaborate on the style you want for this one (presume Broom) and why you cut nearly all the branches?
One last question is about wiring Olives I See you kept the branch horizontal? is this the way to go with Olives? will you bend the branch tip up when it grows a bit?
Thanks.
 
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#38
can you please elaborate on the style you want for this one (presume Broom) and why you cut nearly all the branches?
This trunk is all wrong for a classic/traditional broom form, though I suppose what Walter Pall (and others) might call an "informal broom" (sort of an informal upright-broom hybrid) might be appropriate. I'm keeping my mind open, but my basic guide is a short fat informal upright. This one is still basically in trunk development, as I need to grow at least one or two more trunk sections to smoothly continue that dramatic taper all the way to the top - and that is my primary focus right now. It's entirely possible I'll cut all of the branches off when that's done and start again! For now, I've kept the few branches that seem to be in usable places (and kept them in check), and terminated with extreme prejudice those that are inside bends, too low, or otherwise clearly inappropriate. There actually weren't that many to remove - most of the foliage in the pre-trim photo is attached to just a few places that I didn't want to get out of hand. It should continue to throw buds on the trunk when I make the next chop, giving more options.
One last question is about wiring Olives I See you kept the branch horizontal? is this the way to go with Olives? will you bend the branch tip up when it grows a bit?
Thanks.
It's just a basic idea for informal upright trees. The lowest and heaviest branches are typically closer to horizontal, and the angles get closer and closer to vertical as you move up toward the apex.
To be clear, I'm not necessarily going for a natural/wild olive look . . .