Will you nuts help me?

Messages
271
Likes
1
Location
Scandinavia
USDA Zone
3b
#1
I've been doing bonsai for almost three years now and have been trying to get as much bonsai-time (i.e. "quality-time" :)) as possible. I search the net on a daily basis, I have attended worshops with Marc Nöelanders and Steve Tolley, never missed a club meeting, and visiting about 5-6 different forum on a daily basis. This summer I came to the conclusion that I might have some bonsai material that might be a waste of time.

I don't have many trees (about 15 maybe). Out of those about 5 are crap trees that I can cut often to get me through 8-9 months of no growth due to the climate. The other ones are a couple of young nursery material, and the rest are yamadori. I've posted most of them here and got some good feedback on them (for wich I very thankful!).

Like I said, I got the insight that maybe I was wasting water and fertilizer on some of them and would really like some harsh and honest "criticism" as to wich ones are keepers and wich ones are give-aways, throw-aways and plain crap. Also, it might give someone the same insight as I had so something positive might come out of it?

So, will ye olde nuts help me in my little reflexive introspection?

If more than a couple (the more the merrier!) would be willing to help, I'll post pics tomorrow.

Thanks in advance!
Emil
 
Messages
131
Likes
1
Location
Victoria Australia
#2
Sounds very much you have reached the next level Emil. What seemed to have possibilities as future bonsai no longer hold that appeal for you. Some people never reach the next level and just keep repeating level 1 for many years. You on the other hand seem to have the zest for learning and improving, searching for better stock to work with. I look forward to helping you review what you have. Some may need a complete makeover others destined as garden plants. I am sure you will get plenty of advice from the members.

Ash
 
Messages
1,245
Likes
6
Location
Dartmouth, NS Canada
USDA Zone
6a
#4
I'm willing to give it a whirl if you are indeed receptive. I will be honest with you and provide constructive feedback on what may be worth your while, while others may be a waste of water and resources.
 

Behr

Yamadori
Messages
83
Likes
2
Location
Kyle, Texas USA
#6
Great decision...I too would certainly share my thoughts on this particular decision...This has the potential of becoming a very worthwhile and educational thread...So bring 'em on...

Regards
Behr

:) :) :)
 

Bonsai Nut

Administrator
Messages
7,208
Likes
10,821
Location
OC, CA
USDA Zone
10A
#7
When you learn enough to toss/recycle your poor material, you have learned a lot. Everyone goes through this stage - and you feel like a veil has been lifted from your eyes and you suddenly see old trees in a new light. Churn through a LOT of material as you learn; then when you finally end up with some GOOD trees, you will know how to care for and develop them. Nothing worse than getting a nice black pine and watching it grow away from you in two or three years.
 
Messages
717
Likes
7
#8
Best. Thread. Title. EVER.

Post away. Perhaps seeing what you post will inspire me to toss even more garbage from my benches.
 
Messages
1,772
Likes
9
Location
Ottawa, KS
USDA Zone
6
#9
I must make way on my benches for better material. I have neglected the acquisition of quality material, but that must end and the collection must grow.

Anyone need to refinance their home? Conforming rates are fantastic!
 
Messages
271
Likes
1
Location
Scandinavia
USDA Zone
3b
#10
I'm happy there are so many offering to help! Before this whole thing starts: I really hate to feel the need to say it, but PLEASE don't discuss eachother more than the pics. Just say what you think about the tree regardless of what other posters have said. Don't comment on percieved incitements to start an argument, but discuss the trees.

Another thing, feel free to be as blunt as you wish. There's no need to be all "it's good but maybe there's a better one in the forest somewhere?", I can take "honestly? FIREWOOD!".

The first one up is a collected Pinus sylvestris. Height about 40cm, estimated age (by me) about 30-40ish. Collected last year if I remember correctly. The tree suffered from needle cast (lophodermium) at the time it was collected so the first summer it was very weak, but almost all potential yamadori I've seen where I live seem to suffer from it more or less. Hmmm, what else...Well, just ask if there is anything you'd like to know. Obviously, this tree is at least 2 years away from any styling.
 

Attachments

Messages
2,776
Likes
10
Location
Michigan, USA
USDA Zone
5
#11
Can you show us an exact opposite view of picture number four? From the back side of that picture....?

In picture #2, if the lowest bend on the branch was pulled closer to the trunk, a good start for a Literati may be present.







Will
 
Last edited:
Messages
271
Likes
1
Location
Scandinavia
USDA Zone
3b
#12
Actually I can't, my the camera died on me :eek: . Number two is the opposite, although not perfect.

Hehe, this brings up another issue. There is no need to give me styling ideas (even though it's perfectly alright if someone feels the urge), instead try to focus on wether the tree is worth working on and it's strenghts/weaknesses as you percieve them. If someone thinks this makes the thread a lot less worthwhile I'm willing to change my standpoint.

Thanks for the input, Will.
 
Last edited:
Messages
2,776
Likes
10
Location
Michigan, USA
USDA Zone
5
#13
I thought it was close, thanks. I like the options presented in #2, but alas, I am at work where Adobe Photoshop does not exist. I have an idea in mind and I'll do a virt later, if you don't mind.



Will
 
Messages
653
Likes
101
Location
Waxhaw, NC
USDA Zone
8a
#14
No, it's not...,

Perceived flaw is a negative taper in Pic 1 and 3. Pic 2 offers possibilities.
In general, I like the movement and the age in the bark.
I would keep it and keep working on it if it were mine.

Regards,
Martin
 
Messages
271
Likes
1
Location
Scandinavia
USDA Zone
3b
#15
Thanks Martin! The reverse taper is there. One of my noob-mistakes: grabbing the tree by the trunk when collecting it :mad: . Some of the bark came off...
 
Messages
786
Likes
10
Location
NW Oregon
#16
No its Not,

For this first tree I say it is a keeper..... even with the little bit of reverse taper it could be good.... my thought is a drastic planting angle change.

Now show us some more...

Jason
 
Messages
1,245
Likes
6
Location
Dartmouth, NS Canada
USDA Zone
6a
#17
I would continue to work with it. That sharp bend is highly disireable should literati become an option, but there is definite possibilities.
 
Messages
1,772
Likes
9
Location
Ottawa, KS
USDA Zone
6
#18
I do like view #2, but from the first major bend, the trunk moves directly away from the viewer. Bringing it closer to the trunk may be the best answer, but it is very difficult to tell in two dimensions.
 

Behr

Yamadori
Messages
83
Likes
2
Location
Kyle, Texas USA
#19
If I liked or enjoyed pines then this tree would certainly have enough redeeming characteristics to warrant more time spent...The trunk movement has enough unusual bends and movement changes to make it interesting, and the bark texture is very nice...This will probably never be a tree that will make you famous, nor will it likely be a famous tree, however it does have the potential to become a very memorable exhibit tree...

Regards
Behr

:) :) :)
 

Similar threads