Winter Care

spectatr

Seedling
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Cincinnati area
USDA Zone
6a
Here in North America and Europe winter is creeping up. I am sure there are many threads here which address winter care generally and species specific and even perhaps by Zone. It would be helpful and eliminate many questions to have at least some of these grouped and edited to delete the irrelevant for newbies like myself.
 

flor1

Mame
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Location
N Georgia
Wintering Bonsai

I agree with you a 100% be nice to get some feedback from the people here that have had plants for while. I'm in N.Georgia now and am trying to get all the input I can on wintering my plants.
 
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Location
Michigan, USA
USDA Zone
5
It is best to talk to someone local to you. Find a local club and talk to them about winter care. Climates can vary, even in the same zones there are micro climates, winds, drainage, snowfall or lack of, and other factors that determine how much care you need and then all this varies with the species you have.


Will
 

Kirk

Mame
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Atlanta
USDA Zone
8a
I agree with you a 100% be nice to get some feedback from the people here that have had plants for while. I'm in N.Georgia now and am trying to get all the input I can on wintering my plants.

Winter care in GA is fairly easy. How far north are you? Some of the guys with very nice trees have cool greenhouses and most of their deciduous trees go in there. For the rest of us, moving the pines/junipers from the bench to the ground is adequate. The rest can be placed on the ground and heeled-in with mulch/pine straw. I place some of the more cold sensitive trees near the house and heel-in to protect from freezing wind. Though you may have a tree that is cold hardy (in ground) according to USDA, placing it in a shallow pot or exposed nursery container on a bench changes the equation a little. Placing them on the ground insulates them a bit and helps to mitigate the fast freezing and thawing. We can go from very warm to very cold night temps. It also protects from the circulating cold air above, below and around the pot that a bench would allow.

As an aside, Steve Pilacik's nursery is farther north in the Raleigh-Durham area. He recommends just placing the pines on the ground.

The rest is watching the soil moisture and perhaps an application of dormant oil for the decid. trees.

Kirk
 

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