Winter turned into summer-Maples in leaf

Clicio

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As the climate has been crazy all over, and winter here has suddenly turned into summer, the temperatures are in the highs (85F) during the day.
The result is that my maples are in leaf, when they should be dormant.
I don't really know if it's ok for them to not rest one or more seasons, but I am getting concerned.
Will they get weaker and weaker?
 

just.wing.it

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Oooo...hmmm....
I hate it when that happens...

This reminds me of the past few years in my old house. I used my garage to overwinter some trees because it generally stays cooler in there, and a more steady temperature, even though it wasn't as cold as I'd like.

It did keep them from leafing out on a warm wniter's day, but they still all opened relatively early.

How are your trees being over-wintered?
Do they get any sun?
 
D

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@Clicio how long have you been keeping maples for in Brazil? How short (or long?) of a period do your maples normally go dormant for, and at what temperatures?

Sorry to be asking this. I am very curious about dormancy in general. In Quebec, I have the opposite problem that you have. But in a greenhouse/cold shelet that I am currently researching and planning, I may have precisely the same issue that you are having on warmer days.

Thank you
D
 

Bonsai Nut

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Depending on the species, most "light" deciduous can skip a winter and not miss it too much. I'm not so sure about cold-hardy trees that are used to 6 months of frost, but you probably aren't keeping those in Brazil.

This winter some of my deciduous didn't drop leaves until March... when some of my other deciduous were budding out.
 

Clicio

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derek7745 said:
How short (or long?) of a period do your maples normally go dormant for, and at what temperatures?
Usually for 3 months, whenever the temperatures get to 15C or less AND the days get shorter, they drop their leaves.
Outdoors, shade.
There are many successful growers of maples here.
 
D

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@Clicio Thanks for the response! :)
 

Shun

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My kotohime dropped about 70% of its leaves and the buds are giant.. about to pop and still havent dropped all the leaves. Last winter it has dropped its leaves but budded out about 2 weeks after.

A cutting i'va taken from the same tree its leafing out already.

Climate has been wild these past years. Not sure how it will affect our trees. Almost all my deciduous (flowering cherrys, prunus mume, morus sp.) are budding out. Only my deshojo is still asleep.
 

leatherback

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:( Does nto sound good.
Have you considered using a fridge? I understand that some people defoliate, put the tree or pot (?) in a large bag, and put them in a fridge, giving a bit of air circulation every day. But basically keeping them cold for a bit. Don't trust me for the howto though; Never tried it, as it gets to -20 here.

I guess that only works on small trees / big fridges but..
 

miker

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Depending on the species, most "light" deciduous can skip a winter and not miss it too much. I'm not so sure about cold-hardy trees that are used to 6 months of frost, but you probably aren't keeping those in Brazil.

This winter some of my deciduous didn't drop leaves until March... when some of my other deciduous were budding out.
I agree. Deciduous species like crepe myrtle, bald cypress, Acer rubrum from mild locations, trident maple (among many others) should be fine missing a winter or two.

Like leatherback said, I would go with the fridge option if you can and give your trees plenty of cold to thrive in any tropical or subtropical area.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Some of my Chinese elm cultivars, if I trim them in the late summer, will push new growth in the fall... and then never drop their leaves all winter.

Since we almost never get frost (and definitely no hard freeze) they seem none the worse for the experience.

My best indicator of winters are my stone fruits (in my landscape) which will not fruit unless they have a certain number of cold degree days. This last winter was so mild I did not get a single peach. Normally I get enough that I am giving fruit away to my neighbors.
 

Clicio

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Climate has been wild these past years. Not sure how it will affect our trees...
@Shun , that's so true. I am old enough to remember really cold winters in Sao Paulo and in Curitiba.
They just don't happen anymore.

@leatherback , yes, I have thought about the fridge way (some people in the south do that to grow JWP in Brazil), but it's a matter of lack of space at home (for the big fridge), and I guess it's a lot of work (controlling the temperature, wetness of the trees, timing, etc).
 

Shun

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I do get low enough temperatures. But whats making my trees go crazy is that we get a week or two of cold (about 3°C daily) then we get a hot spell of about 2 weeks also.. ranging up to 27°C in the middle of winter.. it is supposed to be very cold again.
 
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