Wiring scars

Cable

Omono
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Hey I have a newbie question. I hope this isn't rude and I'm not criticizing but I was doing some bonsai reading and stumbled across this thread: https://adamaskwhy.com/2016/07/12/bonsai-in-ohio-evans-trees/

As I looked at the close-ups I couldn't help but notice so many of them had scarring from the wire. Since nobody in the thread mentioned it I'm not sure if it was a mistake (old wire left on too long) or if some marks are to be expected and are unavoidale on certain species and will quickly grow out of it.

So, which is it? Was it wrong or do I have unrealistic expectations? I'm very interested because the first tree he worked on was a bald cypress and I have two of them that I plan to work on in the spring.
 

Starfox

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If you are familiar with Adam's blog he actually advocates leaving the wire on long enough for scarring to occur. That said he is in Florida and often is working on Ficus which in that climate the scarring wont be there for too long.
It can also be used as a method to thicken areas and if you apply the wire in the opposite direction next time can make bark more interesting.
 

Dav4

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Scarring will actually increase the holding power in the new bend, as well as add some potential interest in certain"rugged" specimens, like collected junipers. With that said, I'll echo what Adair said in that that we generally try to minimize them as a rule, but it's impossible to avoid them completely.
 

Cable

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Interesting. Thanks, guys! I'll probably have more dumb questions as I learn. :)
 

davejg

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Hi guys, first question from me to,brand new to this as i got a seed kit for chrismas. Is there a reason you dont use rubber covered silid core copper wire i assumed it would protect the tree more.
 

Adair M

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Hi guys, first question from me to,brand new to this as i got a seed kit for chrismas. Is there a reason you dont use rubber covered silid core copper wire i assumed it would protect the tree more.
Because it’s not annealed. Annealed copper is much softer and goes on easily. Also, as time passes, it turns brown, and is hardly noticeable. Covered wire would stick out like a sore thumb!
 

KingJades

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From what I can see, most people who work with ficus and many other tropicals (largely what you see Adam working with) allow the wire to dig deep to hold the bends. Ficus bounce back from wiring quickly so it takes longer for the bends to hold, but luckily they bounce back quick from the resulting scars as well.

Even in Pittsburgh, the deepest wire scars I make on a ficus heal within a year so I don't rush to get the wire off. Of course, you don't really want it to cut deeper than needed to hold the branch.

Hope that helps.
 

bonsaidave

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Ficus don't like to cooperate. Sometimes you have to show them who's boss. Wiring most trees during their growing season means you must keep a vigilant eye for wire digging in. It can happen faster than you think.
 
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Depends on the species. Most conifers have thick bark and you'll not see the scarring in 5 years. Most deciduous are a bit more sensitive and more care must be taken. Scarring does at character as long as not obvious when the tree is shown. So first wiring might be ok to cut in a fair bit, as stated before it helps the branches to stay put. More to the end of development don't let them bite...
 

Tieball

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Except for those who set out to do it for a reason, wire binding is always accompanied, when discovered, by the familiar "Aw, crap!" Song of joy. Then rapid unwiring, as if speed will undo the damage.
That comment about Speed cracked me up.
 
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