WLO Beginning

plant_dr

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When that nebari matures more, it will be nice. In the last picture, will you remove one of those two parallel roots or do you think they will be ok if you just separate them?
 

Jcmmaple

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Nice, I will definitely be watching the progress. Willow oak is on my top 5 list, now I just need to finds where to collect one.
 

LanceMac10

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...did this with a Pin Oak years ago and tell you what, trunk went back to fresh seedling green....WTF? Threw plenty of shoots, wire quick because they get woody fast.

….killed it via less than adequate wintering care....HD special, so I didn't get too emotional..... :D :D :D

Roots have a nice start. Good luck!:cool:
 

LanceMac10

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just that it was 6' tall and grey before I chopped it. What was left turned to green, not sickly, just a real young looking green. No ill effects, just something I noticed.
 

Peter44

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I tried two oaks, Pin oak and Willow leafed) this spring that I bought as bare root seedlings off line. They were 4-6' but had big long tap roots that I had to cut off. The bases were about 1". The willow did not make it. The pin has three sprouts coming and going straight up. I am assuming it is ok to let them just grow to develop the trunk and do the branch ramification later in life??
 

plant_dr

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The pin has three sprouts coming and going straight up. I am assuming it is ok to let them just grow to develop the trunk and do the branch ramification later in life??
Some could say to pick one as the next trunk section and eliminate the others so the tree doesn't waste energy thickening
unnecessary growth. The other side of it is that more foliage = more energy production = faster recovery/ devopment. I'd lean towards letting them all run wild for awhile. Yes build branches later.
 

just.wing.it

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Happy American Independence Day to all the Liberty lovers out there!

Taking off now!
I saw several small yellow caterpillars on the branch tips this morning, as well as a spot what I think was white powdery mildew on one branch.
Neem to the rescue.
20190704_081045.jpg
 

just.wing.it

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More Neem today after seeing more F'ing caterpillars.
No problem though.
I've been winning that battle this year, handedly.

I was thinking of a broomish, spreading broomlike oak style.....but now I'm seeing this strong leader, re-reading what @LanceMac10 told me, and thinking differently about this tree's future now.

I think I want a taller tree with some trunk movement. Which will require ground growing.
Does anyone think that removing all but the strongest leader is beneficial?
 

leatherback

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you now have several strong branches in a relatie=vely short trunk space. I think you are setting yourself up for bulges with this many thicker branches. I would not have let all of them grow out like this.
Why don't you cover the nebari more, and try to get smoe growth there?
 

just.wing.it

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you now have several strong branches in a relatie=vely short trunk space. I think you are setting yourself up for bulges with this many thicker branches. I would not have let all of them grow out like this.
Why don't you cover the nebari more, and try to get smoe growth there?
I was having this same thought....about the bulges.
My plan is to put it in the ground in a few years.
I think I'll bare root it next spring, sort out the roots, at least one of those nebari roots will have to go.
There may even be a whole other, larger nebari below the soil line.....in which case, all of the roots you see will be removed.
At any rate, plan to bare root and pot it for a year or 2, then go into the ground once a better nebari is established.

Once in the ground, maybe I can remove branches I don't want and grow the leader out for a good next trunk section.
I'm hoping that ground growing will kill any bulges, and thicken the whole trunk substantially.
 

just.wing.it

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I was looking at this one again the other day with the paste removed.
Some die back at the cut point and some good growth from the leader, it's right even with the edge of the chop now and about a thrid of the grith of the lower trunk.
Hoping this will give a good transition in the future, and a bit of movement.

I'll carve the chop out, but WHEN is the best time?

Its still growing now, Autumn and Winter will be here before I know it.
20191002_190224.jpg
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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My favorite time for power tool carving on trees is while the root ball is frozen solid in middle of winter. This way vibrations from the die grinder, or dremel, or reciprocating saw will not break fine hair roots, the feeder roots on the trunk. I had a couple summer power tool carving projects crash and die in summer, and I thought the vibration of the trunk broke too many fine roots.

So far my winter projects have all been fine.

But if your winters are too warm to freeze the pot and roots solid of your trees, you should exercise caution with regard to vibrating the trunk excessively.
 

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