Work or Play?

Tachigi

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Yesterday I decided to go do a little tree hunting to mark for this fall or next spring. For deciduous trees in these parts the best hunting is in geographic areas that are subject to natural force....in this case it was water. Taylor , Scooby and I went and explored about 6 miles of a creek that ran down from the mountains to the Susquehanna. The only way to access this creek due to its extremely high steep banks was to get in it and start hoofing it, talk about some cold water. We decided this time around to focus on one species...to get tunnel vision so to speak. Our prey was the willow oak. We found hundreds of them but only a hand full worth collecting, all on creek bends where the water picked up speed and transormed these trees from ramrod straight to twisted and kinked trunks. Taylor and I thought you might enjoy what we saw and a couple of the trees we found.

The second and third pic really don't do justice to this tree. It sat out on a point in the creek where it got pounded by flood waters. It was so buried in crap and debris that only a few leaves poked out of the pile which Taylor spotted, explored and found this underneath after 15 minutes of clearing it away. What also isn't visible is the really large basal flair. This will be some great material later.
 
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Tachigi

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To show you the force of mother nature on these trees look above taylor on the branch. That is the high water mark from a recent rain. The last two pictures are of another willow the trunk is about 12 inches at the base. Look at all the feeders on this thing. All nice and close. This very large trunk is ready to almost fall out due to the under cutting current of the creek.
 
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rlist

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Tom & Taylor-

Nice! A day on the water, for whatever reason, is a day to cherish. I must say though, I think a drift boat is in your future - it keeps the cold water at bay, you can traverse shallow water easily, and you don't have to hoof the trees out...

Can you tell me what the root situation is like on these? Being here in Orygun, we have lots of rivers, but the majority of the the trees we come across on the banks have roots that seem to never end - and no fine roots. What do you see on these willow oaks???
 

irene_b

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Beautiful area there Tom!
Water is a great force and can create beauty as well as destruction.
Irene
 

Tachigi

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Hi Rich,
I think a drift boat is in your future - it keeps the cold water at bay
My answer to that would be I couldn't agree more. However for hunting purposes a slow walk to me is always best. You don't miss a thing. Then we use a make shift tube and plank platform to drag them out.
Taylor's answer I don't need no stinking boat ... Dad can handle the cold water and the 100 lb backpack.
Can you tell me what the root situation is like on these?
Nice roots, feeders in very close to the trunk. You can actually see them on the second tree. Whats great about this area is that its a gorge so to speak, Very steep rocky sides. You go down about a foot and hit that solid rock. So they flair and run. Lifting these are pretty easy.
What do you see on these willow oaks???
These are good to great trunks the current during high water as stripped the branches. The only foliage is what the water didn't get. So the possibilities are endless. They are very fast growers so in no time at all you can establish primary branching.
 
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Nice finds Tom, post some potted pictures when you get a chance to, I'd like to see that.

Hey Taylor, did he make you do all the work?

Will
 

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