Would you buy a pot?

Klytus

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From an old ex-con?

I was wondering if prison potters,they teach pottery in some English prisons,could have a market on the outside?

Would you add Jailbird Pottery.Gov to your favourites and look from time to time to see if anything was suitable?

Could the market sustain such new competition?

I wondered about this as there may well be many more cons and ex-cons with pottery and glaze skills than general members of the public with any idea.

Do they sell prison goods in the states?

Is there an online gallery?

Ship internationally?

Just some idle thoughts.
 
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Ain't most potters ex-cons anyhow? ;)


In all seriousness, who cares? The end result is the determining factor, besides, I am not about to request a full background check on a potter unless he is asking to date my daughter and even then his pots better be damn good.





Will
 

Klytus

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I wondered as the UK ceramics industry does not exist anymore but they do use prison labour for shoes and textiles.

I had words with my MP about the reintroduction of the Workhouse,a modern place with no Oakum.
 

rockm

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depends...Does he have any actual experience with bonsai? If not, just like any other potter that thinks bonsai is an easy secondary market for their art pottery, I would not buy.

Bonsai pots, or at least pots that can actually be used, are an extremely specialized market. The high end, hand made market isn't an easy one to navigate. I've had trouble with "arteest" potters completely misreading what a bonsai pot is all about. They simply can't grasp that their "art" has to be subservient to a freakin tree...They assume their pots should shout out and be the focal point. Only a few make it past this point and give up after they fail to sell anything.

Additionally, getting a potter to understand their work also has to meet horticultural needs is another huge hurdle. Adequate drain holes in proper locations, precisely level container bottoms, along with the correctly textured clay all take time to learn and produce.
 

redvw5

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I would definetely buy a pot from an ex-con or a convict. I am really into corrections. If the offfender was incarcerated at the time he was making/selling pottery I would only purchase if money was going to victims families or to pay for the cost of incaceration.
 

J W

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I missed the " a " part. I was going to say hell no. It's probally a bust operation...

Good work deserves a good price.

JW
 

Klytus

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At least one UK importer and supplier of Chinese trees is out of the game due to import bans.

Surely there is now a market for British grown trees,it's not as if some of those prisoners have no experience with horticulture.

It wouldn't have to be like working on the plantation and picking cotton,though the pay would be similar.

Surely better than learning cobbling or making mail sacks?
 

treebeard55

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I have to agree with Will on this one: the quality of the pot, and the price for that quality, would be the determining factor for me.

Altho I do like the idea of the money going to victims' families.
 

Dwight

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I'm in...now lets find a prison that does pottery and send one of our potters over to teach bonsai pot making.
 

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