Wound Dressing - Needed or Myth?

dbonsaiw

Chumono
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I came across an article on myths that persist in the bonsai community despite science to the contrary (for example, Vitamin B doesn't treat transplant shock). I was surprised to read that the author deemed the use of wound sealants as one of the myths, and in fact stated it could be harmful to the tree. This clearly runs against common practice and, IMO, common sense. Can someone address if this is indeed a legitimate issue and, if so, what are the potential cons of treating wounds/pros of not doing so?
 

rockm

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I came across an article on myths that persist in the bonsai community despite science to the contrary (for example, Vitamin B doesn't treat transplant shock). I was surprised to read that the author deemed the use of wound sealants as one of the myths, and in fact stated it could be harmful to the tree. This clearly runs against common practice and, IMO, common sense. Can someone address if this is indeed a legitimate issue and, if so, what are the potential cons of treating wounds/pros of not doing so?
It is and isn't necessary--and not for reasons that are typically cited for its use. Sealing wounds isn't necessary for healing, but it can help, as can intelligently done hard pruning.

I use it PRIMARILY to prevent cut wounds from drying out, where traditionally, it's been used to prevent infection. Trees wall off wounds to stop infection. However, large pruning wounds, particularly on "thin skinned" trees, such as hornbeam, beech and maple can dry out rapidly after pruning. Moisture drawn from tissues can cause further cambium dieback at the cut site.

Sealing the wound, keeps it moist and that moisture level can promote faster callusing. I used to be a "no sealer" person, but have altered my point of view somewhat as I've seen first-hand that sealing can help in some situations.
 

Dav4

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The problem is that some people continually try to compare trees being grown in pots with trees being grown in your yard or the woods. It HAS been shown that wound sealants aren't that helpful and potentially harmful in trees being grown for lumbar. In my experience and many others, that doesn't necessarily transfer to using sealants on our potted trees. I primarily use cut paste or other sealants on deciduous trees to prevent new cuts from drying out which, in turn, facilitates more rapid callusing. Any way, get yourself some duct seal from home depot and try it... I bet you'll like it ;) .
 

sorce

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The objective is to provide a solid surface for the wound to close over.

Growth rate, cut size, and wood characteristic are the equation needed to determine how much work is necessary to provide this surface.

A twig needs no work, a gaping 6inch hole may need cement.

I believe external Japanese style cut paste or duct seal type products are useful somewhere in between.

There are certainly climates and situations where it will only further rot.

Sorce
 

BrianBay9

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Don't know if it helps faster healing, but if you choose the right color it looks better. And it helps me ignore the cuts while they heal. I wonder if it APPEARS to facilitate faster healing because I don't obsess about it so much.
 

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