Akapazan

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Just collected this yamadori beech. Really easy collect and tons of small fine roots. Kind of in doubt of how i should prune and style this? Any advise? :)
 

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19Mateo83

Chumono
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Welcome to bonsai nut! That’s a good looking beech ya got. I would focus on keeping it alive and letting it recover from collection this year. Beech can be finicky, or so I’ve heard. Also it will help if you add your location and hardiness zone to your profile so the kind folk here can give you more specific advice.
 

rockm

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Second photo is most promising side I think. Prune off the big left growing branch and shorten the others by at least half...What does the nebari look like underneath that moss? I would also not make too many plans for it at this point and not for another two years. Beech are slow, very very slow. I had one for 20 years. Worked into a reasonable bonsai in that time, but it took some specialized care to get it there. Oh, and SEAL all pruning wounds on the top. Beech is very thin-skinned and can dry out fast from the wounds resulting in die back.
 

Akapazan

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Second photo is most promising side I think. Prune off the big left growing branch and shorten the others by at least half...What does the nebari look like underneath that moss? I would also not make too many plans for it at this point and not for another two years. Beech are slow, very very slow. I had one for 20 years. Worked into a reasonable bonsai in that time, but it took some specialized care to get it there. Oh, and SEAL all pruning wounds on the top. Beech is very thin-skinned and can dry out fast from the wounds resulting in die back.
Thanks, just did that 😊
 

Akapazan

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Thanks, just did that 😊
Welcome to bonsai nut! That’s a good looking beech ya got. I would focus on keeping it alive and letting it recover from collection this year. Beech can be finicky, or so I’ve heard. Also it will help if you add your location and hardiness zone to your profile so the kind folk here can give you more specific advice.
Welcome to bonsai nut! That’s a good looking beech ya got. I would focus on keeping it alive and letting it recover from collection this year. Beech can be finicky, or so I’ve heard. Also it will help if you add your location and hardiness zone to your profile so the kind folk here can give you more specific advice.
Thanks just did that 😊
 

Akapazan

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Would you put this in a black sack and if so, should the whole tree or only the pot be covered by the sack? It is in my shed which is about 5 degrees Celsius and completely dark.
 

Potawatomi13

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Would you put this in a black sack and if so, should the whole tree or only the pot be covered by the sack? It is in my shed which is about 5 degrees Celsius and completely dark.
Wait. Leave tree alone this year! Do NOT repot. One root disturbance more than enough for one year already. Let grow freely to regain strength/roots.
 

Akapazan

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Wait. Leave tree alone this year! Do NOT repot. One root disturbance more than enough for one year already. Let grow freely to regain strength/roots.
I am not talking about another repot, i dug it up, placed in training pot. So i just wanted to know if it would benefit from the Black bag method 😊
 

Potawatomi13

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Will get wider spread, shallower roots with present method than in bag;).
 

RJG2

Chumono
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So in other words: "No".
He thinks you mean a grow bag, not a humidity bag. I can't give you an answer as to whether beech respond well to the method or not though.
 

HoneyHornet

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Nice find and yea definitely let it grow untouched for a year, they can tend to even push a flush of growth off reserves alone so just because buds pop open doesn’t mean you are out of the woods but i think this is a great start- mine was aggressively pruned upon collection left about 1 or 2 buds on each branch- that’s how I went into my “don’t touch” phase, and it grew strong and I just held off and let it do it’s thing and hopefully this year it takes another step in the right direction

If you got most of the roots you can leave most those buds but I would have probably balanced out the load a tiny bit, nip back to just a few on each branch and then let grow out to about 6 then back to 2, then another 8and prune back and leave 3 etc, slowly work them branches but again as everyone will point out- when in doubt let that beech recover— I had a long branch I left out of principal to leave some growth for energy- but I wish I just took it back from the start because it wasted some juice on making buds at the very end of an already too long of branch- so get rid of what will not be there basically from the jump lol that’s what I’ll be sticking to at least- it was my first beach tho so I went extra gentle
 

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