Yamadori - Group Fun Activity

rollwithak

Shohin
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Hello All! I thought this would be a fun exercise to get an all-inclusive thread going.

Yamadori is a term used by the Japanese to describe trees collected from the wild. It does have some more depth to its meaning but for simplicity sake, we will just call it, trees collected from the wild and/or locations such as gardens where the plant or tree was left to grow on its own.

There is a great amount of respect and consideration that must go into taking plants from the wild. You really should only be taking plants when:

1. If you have permission from a private land owner
2. If some form of demolition or hardship will befall over this plant. If the plant is not going to survive, it is quite justified to save.
3. My "gray area" and extension from rule #2.... There are times in the wile where you see trees in competition with a senior plant, or so close to a large amount of other trees, I find it responsible and healthy for the forest to remove a tree or two. But only if it is relieving stress on a large concentration of trees.


So without further adieu, post a picture or two of some YAMADORI you have recovered from the wild and or possibly even other's gardens. It doesn't JUST have to be from the wild. If your Aunt Betty had some trees or bushes that she payed no attention to and you took it for Bonsai, share it.

List:
- what species
- where you nabbed it (geographically)
- roughly when you recovered it and how long you've had it
- any interesting training or changes you've made to the plant
- anything else you'd like us to know!






My Photos
1). Incense Cedar recovered from Idyllwild, CA in June of 2019. This tree was underneath a very large oak tree with roughly 15 other seedlings around his size. I found one that was looking like it was having a hard time surviving and was in competition with many other elements. So far I have just been letting it grow and recover her strength. I have recently pinched some new growth and have been feeding her through the summer.
2). Boxwood tree that had been neglected and left to just grow wild for 20 years by a local nursery grow property in Fresno, CA. New friend I met at the nursery allowed me two take 2 of them. I've cleaned this up and repotted it, been feeding it as well and seen some good recovery and growth this summer.
3). The 2nd boxwood of the 2 I was allowed to take. This one was rumored to be 30 years old and you can really see some great detail on the bark. I am hoping to be able to do some good wiring to these but I'm not sure if they are too old at this point to move.

Again all, I am just a beginner bonsai student. Many of you will see many things I am doing wrong, so please feel free to use constructive criticism. I joined this forum to learn and grow in this passion we share.
 

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Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
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Lots of them are in this thread...
 

rollwithak

Shohin
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Lots of them are in this thread...
Damnit!!!
 

rollwithak

Shohin
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I even looked through categories before posting, guess I better refine my searching skills
 

choppychoppy

Chumono
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Seedlingadori. Haha. Usually the reason to collect a tree from the wild is the tree already has the trunk characteristics for a bonsai. Not usually to collect accent sized plants or things to grow out for years.
 

rollwithak

Shohin
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Seedlingadori. Haha. Usually the reason to collect a tree from the wild is the tree already has the trunk characteristics for a bonsai. Not usually to collect accent sized plants or things to grow out for years.
Yes I very much understand that. But if one likes the challenge of raising and taking pride and joy from the process, it can be done. The tree I just posted in "the tree" forum was a Live Oak that was renegade growing through one of the rose bushes on the house I just bought.. check it out and give me your advice!!!
 

Tycoss

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The term “yamadori” apparently literally means “taken from the mountains”. You seem to see three types of collected trees on this forum: collected seedlings that you can either use as accents or grow out for years, trees planted by people and no longer wanted, and mature wild trees that some insist are the only trees yamadori applies to. I have all three typed and love them for different reasons. There are no bonsai nurseries in my area, so almost everything I have was collected somewhere. I’ll put an example of each type below once I run out to get pictures.
 

Tycoss

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Type one, seedling type: this is one of a bunch of cotoneaster seedlings I dug out of my yard in April of this year. I live near Calgary Alberta, zone 3. I have more of these, the oldest I’ve had for about 3 years. They will eventually become accents or mame or something. Cute when they get little black berriesD9AD28C6-EE23-4374-BB2F-50D1E2D80135.jpeg
 

Tycoss

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The second type are trees planted by people in yards and public areas that are no longer wanted but still have some age and maturity to them. This one is a boxwood found three years ago at a dump. It was a three foot wide and high piece of hedging that was mostly dead on on side. I allowed it to gain vigour and cut it back very far last year. You are right in supposing that buxus are very rigid and hard to wire. You may need to add movement by cutting back and training new shoots.AF4022F6-EAB7-48DC-A24F-E5A749A8B57C.jpeg
 

Tycoss

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Finally there is “real” yamadori from wild sources. Legalities and ethics can be more of a concern with these, and they are generally harder to collect. Here are two white spruce, picea englemanni or glauca. These were collected this May 2019 in the Canadian Rockies. First one 3” tall the second one just under 2”. They will not be touched until they become really vigorous. E4C4CF8C-A76C-4336-890B-FC224E30358C.jpegE151EA02-DD20-4A3E-8A91-22EC0A706D3A.jpeg
 

sorce

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Not usually to collect accent sized plants or things to grow out for years.

There is no better be place to obtain material for grow out purposes.

Free. Local. Proven.

What are we to do, buy seeds?
Or ship things thru the mail from the arbor day foundation?

Lesser quality.

If we are going to create world class Deciduous trees in the US, it will start with this very material.

All the rest of these larger Deciduous we have found and chopped and consider good Deciduous material just isn't.

Until we find the right cow pastures.

Keep digging them smallins.

Sorce
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
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I even looked through categories before posting, guess I better refine my searching skills
Entire category on collecting trees here:
 

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