Your thoughts please.

pjkatich

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
33
Location
Northeast Florida
USDA Zone
9
Here are a few pots that came out of the last two firings.

Any thoughts on the finishes used on this set?

All these pots are round.

Paul
 

Attachments

  • PX-001-11.jpg
    PX-001-11.jpg
    29.1 KB · Views: 181
  • PX-003-11.jpg
    PX-003-11.jpg
    30.2 KB · Views: 174
  • PX-010-11.jpg
    PX-010-11.jpg
    61 KB · Views: 166
  • PX-011-11.jpg
    PX-011-11.jpg
    56.5 KB · Views: 146
  • 306-003-11.jpg
    306-003-11.jpg
    36.1 KB · Views: 200

Si Nguyen

Omono
Messages
1,046
Reaction score
183
Location
Lake Forest, CA
All good! I like the cracked and the blue finishes the most.
Your photography is very good too. Very enjoyable to look at these fine pots.
Thanks.
Si
 

DaveV

Shohin
Messages
408
Reaction score
54
Location
Nebraska
USDA Zone
5a
I like the second and third pots the best. Good job !

DaveV
 

Jason

Shohin
Messages
499
Reaction score
125
Location
Western Oregon
USDA Zone
8
Taste is a funny thing. I love all of them besides the blue (I'm sure this one has it's place for the right tree)....The final one pictured is remarkable. :)
 

bonsai barry

Omono
Messages
1,374
Reaction score
37
Location
Cental Coast of California
USDA Zone
9
I echo Jason's opinions. My first thought on seeing the blue glaze was the it was beautiful but I couldn't visualize what kind of tree could keep that pot in its place.
 

Si Nguyen

Omono
Messages
1,046
Reaction score
183
Location
Lake Forest, CA
But pots can be enjoyed just by themselves. They don't need to have a tree in them to be complete. One shouldn't try to imagine a tree to pair with a nice pot. You guys are being too practical. But I actually have great little twisted, windswept style Japanese quince (toyo nishiki) with little white and pink flowers that would match very well with that blue pot.
 

grouper52

Masterpiece
Messages
2,371
Reaction score
3,585
Location
Port Orchard, WA
USDA Zone
8
I am very fond of number five. Number two is quite nice as well. How large are they, and are you selling them?
 

pjkatich

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
33
Location
Northeast Florida
USDA Zone
9
All good! I like the cracked and the blue finishes the most.
Your photography is very good too. Very enjoyable to look at these fine pots.
Thanks.
Si

Your welcome Si,

I'm glad you find some enjoyment in my work.

Your feedback is always welcome.

Regards,
Paul
 

pjkatich

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
33
Location
Northeast Florida
USDA Zone
9
Taste is a funny thing. I love all of them besides the blue (I'm sure this one has it's place for the right tree)....The final one pictured is remarkable. :)

Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts Jason.

Blue pots are not for everyone and this particular finish is a bit on the flashy side. However, it does catch the eye now, doesn't it.

This glaze would best suit a bonsai that has flowers in a complimentary color. I plan on pairing it up with a nice little Gelsemium sempervirens that I have that produces yellow flowers.

That last pot is a new glaze I have been experimenting with. This is it's first test on a bonsai pot. I was satisfied with the way this pot turned out when I took it out of the kiln last Monday.

Regards,
Paul
 

pjkatich

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
33
Location
Northeast Florida
USDA Zone
9
I echo Jason's opinions. My first thought on seeing the blue glaze was the it was beautiful but I couldn't visualize what kind of tree could keep that pot in its place.

Thanks for the feedback Barry.

Think of a purple flowered wisteria in full bloom.

Regards,
Paul
 

pjkatich

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
33
Location
Northeast Florida
USDA Zone
9
But pots can be enjoyed just by themselves. They don't need to have a tree in them to be complete. One shouldn't try to imagine a tree to pair with a nice pot. You guys are being too practical. But I actually have great little twisted, windswept style Japanese quince (toyo nishiki) with little white and pink flowers that would match very well with that blue pot.

Well said Si.

Your absolutely right, sometimes you just need to sit back and admire the pot.

Just look as the antique Chinese pots. The majority of them are very colorful and ornate. Hard to match up with a tree but very easy on the eyes. I think the reason they have been around for so long is that they were more likely intended for eye candy than as a functional bonsai pot.

I like your choice of tree, I think it would match up well with this glaze.

Cheers,
Paul
 

pjkatich

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
33
Location
Northeast Florida
USDA Zone
9
I am very fond of number five. Number two is quite nice as well. How large are they, and are you selling them?

Hi grouper,

I see by your choices that you are a man of texture.

Thanks for the feedback.

Regards,
Paul
 

crhabq

Mame
Messages
105
Reaction score
0
Location
albuquerque, nm
USDA Zone
7
Paul,
I wasn't familar with Gelsemium sempervirens, so I googled it. Very nice match for the blue pot. Do you have one with a nice trunk? I'd be interested in seeing the plant and the pot together.

Wikipedia reports that the sap of this plant is toxic to some people so you may want to get disposible gloves to do any pruning on this. Also, all parts of the plant are toxic when ingested (children may mistake it for honeysuckle), and it tends to kill honeybees.

And hey, all b-nutters: Paul makes great pots! As the proud owner of two of his pots, I can attest to to his high standards in both contruction and aesthetics. His prices are fair as well.

Paul, if you plan on using the blue pot with the Gelsemium sempervirens will you please post the results and share with us how you went about training it to become a bonsai?

Thanks,
Ray
 

pjkatich

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
33
Location
Northeast Florida
USDA Zone
9
Paul,
I wasn't familar with Gelsemium sempervirens, so I googled it. Very nice match for the blue pot. Do you have one with a nice trunk? I'd be interested in seeing the plant and the pot together.

Wikipedia reports that the sap of this plant is toxic to some people so you may want to get disposible gloves to do any pruning on this. Also, all parts of the plant are toxic when ingested (children may mistake it for honeysuckle), and it tends to kill honeybees.

And hey, all b-nutters: Paul makes great pots! As the proud owner of two of his pots, I can attest to to his high standards in both contruction and aesthetics. His prices are fair as well.

Paul, if you plan on using the blue pot with the Gelsemium sempervirens will you please post the results and share with us how you went about training it to become a bonsai?

Thanks,
Ray

Hi Ray,

Much obliged for all the kind words. I appreciate your support.

The blue pot is in the pipeline. It was loaded into the bisque kiln today and I plan of firing the gas kiln next Friday.

In regards to the Gelsemium sempervirens, yes, you are correct about it's toxicity and yes, I think the one I have been growing as a bonsai has an interesting trunk. I would be happy to start a separate thread on this Gelsemium sempervirens if you like.

Cheers,
Paul
 

pjkatich

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
33
Location
Northeast Florida
USDA Zone
9
Now here's one that's pushing the envelop a bit.

Any thoughts on this one?

Thanks,
Paul
 

Attachments

  • PX-013-11.jpg
    PX-013-11.jpg
    31.9 KB · Views: 73

pjkatich

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
33
Location
Northeast Florida
USDA Zone
9
This might be suited to a red crabapple.

Ray

I think you might be on to something there Ray. I can envision that concept very easily.

Or, maybe something with red berry's on it in the fall.

Thanks, for feedback.

Paul
 

Similar threads

Top