A question for Southern growers.

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
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Well, I will finally be moving my family and my bonsai collection down to Atlanta the end of this month. I have heard that the warm weather and higher humidity in the Southeast increase the likelihood of fungal disease becoming an issue. I have never preemptively applied fungicide to my trees, but I understand that this may be a reasonable procedure to consider. My collection includes Pines(JBP, JRP, Lodgepole, Ponderosa), Junipers (Rocky Mountain, Shimpaku/chinensis cultivars, Prostrata), Yews, Maples (palmatums, tridents), Satsuki azaleas, Chinese elms, Japanese apricots, Quince, and crab apples. I'm asking folks that grow any of these in the Southeast to please comment on their approach to fungicide application year round. Thanks for any advice,

Dave

(who is planning on getting involved with the Atlanta Bonsai Society at some point, but will be VERY busy for a while after the move)
 

Klytus

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I cannot help with advise but i can offer my sympathies with your upheaval.

I recently moved ,and i am off right now to peruse the surrounding countryside for candidates.
 

FrankP999

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I live 80 miles south of Atlanta. I don't regularly use fungicide.

Welcome to "Gaw-ga"! By the way, the Atlanta Bonsai Society has a picnic planned for the end of this month - the 27'th. It will be held at the Monastery in Conyers, GA.

Frank
 
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Kirk

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Dave,

I use a fungicide on pines for needle cast and on the elms/fruit trees for black spot during the growing season. You can apply it weekly and after rain to keep everything in good shape. We are finally receiving some rain and are now back to non-drought watering restrictions (odd/even day watering). Covert ninja watering has been tough. With all of the additional humidity I'm watching closely for fungus. The maples and junipers should be fine.

Best,
Kirk

P.S. Don't forget to pack your hoop skirt. Someone may invite you to the B-B-Q at Twelve Oaks.
 

mcpesq817

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I live in DC, which probably doesn't get as hot, but is generally close to the temperatures and humidity levels you get in Atlanta.

So far in two years the only real trouble I had from fungus was on my chinese elms (the regular variety), where I always seem to get black spot. The cork bark elms though seem to be very resistant to it, and I haven't had any problems with them, so I'm moving more to the cork bark variety and staying away from the regular variety. Maples and azaleas I have to watch out for the sun, but otherwise they seem to do fine. I've never had any problems with junipers or pines, or with my flowering quince. I have an apricot and crab apple in the ground, and they are doing fine with no issues.

The biggest problem I have are rabbits - cute little buggers, but the seem overly eager to help me prune the trees I have growing in the ground :(
 

Kirk

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The biggest problem I have are rabbits - cute little buggers, but the seem overly eager to help me prune the trees I have growing in the ground :([/QUOTE]

Braising with a wine reduction and serving with seasonal ramps should take care of the critter problem. :)
 

BUBBAFRGA

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I live about 5 hours south of Atlanta on Coast. I do not have any pines but I don't use any fungicide either. It has a lot to do with how you water and you soil mix.
 
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I live just south of atlanta.
I only spray copper for pine needle cast...but my procumbens caught something nasty this year,and I have lost almost all of them,though my other kinds of junipers are uneffected..
other trees like satsuki and deciduious make it just fine without any fungicide,if you water properly and they have good drainage.
It is finally raining again in georgia,so you might want to tip the pots of trees in the evening if they get a night shower...though if your soil drains good,that probably wont be a problem.
 

Dav4

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Thanks everyone for their input. Most of my trees are in 100% inorganic mixes(some are recently dug and still have native soil in the root ball). I guess I won't worry about it, but will closely watch the trees this summer. I'm really looking forward to getting down to Georgia...unfortunately, on June27, I am unlikely to make the ABS picnic as my trees and I will be about halfway through the trip and most likely lost in NC:D. Wish me luck,

Dave
 

mcpesq817

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The biggest problem I have are rabbits - cute little buggers, but the seem overly eager to help me prune the trees I have growing in the ground :(

Braising with a wine reduction and serving with seasonal ramps should take care of the critter problem. :)[/QUOTE]

Mmm...rabbit...

I used to see one or two a day in the neighborhood. Now I probably see close to 3 or 4. The whole "breeding like rabbits" phrase is quite true.
 

rockm

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Biggest adjustment

Your biggest adjustment moving from Mass. to Ga. won't be fungal disease. It will be sun intensity. While you may be able to keep thin leaved trees like Acer Palmatum in full or half day summer sun in New England. Such exposure will damage those trees in the South. Serious southern Bonsaists make sun shades for their benches, or grow more sun tolerant plants- I keep trident maples in full sun all summer here in Va. for instance. Keeps the leaves small.

Also, you will most likely have some leaf drop on many plants that get too much sun this summer right after your move. Leaves that developed and spouted in sun conditions in Massachusetts will not be able to stand the same exposure times in Atlanta. Leaves develop depending on local conditions. The amount of sun the can take is determined when they sprout. It is not adjustable.

Fungal diseases aren't any more likely in the South than they are in the North, if you understand how to water. Humidity levels are of course alot higher in the warmer Southern air. That CAN mean you water less, as transpiration is slower.

Finally, and this is as important in the North as it is in the South, knowing HOW to water is just as important as WHEN you water. Correct watering techniques can eliminate most fungal problems and black spot on elms. DON'T WATER THE FOLIAGE--especially just before or after dark. WATER ONLY THE SOIL. DON'T MIST ANYTHING (although there are a very few exceptions).

P.S. Some of your plants, especially the apples, apricots and possibly the Quince rely on colder winter weather to get their genetically programmed "chilling hours" during dormancy. They could begin to face away on you if they are more cold-tolerant varieties.
 

Dav4

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Hey Mark, I really appreciate your input. Sun exposure was always my biggest concern with the move South. My plan will be to keep all the trees in increased shade for at least several weeks, then gradually increase sun exposure to the more sun tolerant trees. I was concerned about fungal disease mainly because Warren Hill told me it would be an issue growing trees near Atlanta. I met him at the National exhibit last October where he exhibited a huge ponderosa and I asked him about growing certain species in more Southern climates. Anyway, I'm not planning on doing any preemptive treatments this summer. And thanks for the info on chilling requirements. Except for one urban yamadori crab, the rest of the apricots and quince all came from CA so I think they will all do OK. I'm more concerned about the Rocky Mountain junipers and other collected pines. Based on what I've been told from local growers, they will most likely do OK, as well. We'll see, I guess. Take care,

Dave
 

cquinn

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I live 90 miles north of Atlanta, and I have to keep the copper fungacide handy for pines. As long as you have them out in the open, dew will collect on them overnight if no rain is forcasted. If it is, then of course they will get rained on. The humidity here will be the first thing that blows you away. Its strange getting off of a plane in Atlanta after being out West. It actually takes a day or two to get used to breathing here again. I never really noticed a difference coming from the Northeast though.
 

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
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The humidity here will be the first thing that blows you away. Its strange getting off of a plane in Atlanta after being out West. It actually takes a day or two to get used to breathing here again. I never really noticed a difference coming from the Northeast though.

Yeah, it get's pretty humid up here in the Northeast...it just doesn't stay so humid all summer long. Thanks for the post.

Dave
 

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