Brown azalea leaves.

noissee

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Not only did I find my elm sickly this morning, but my azalea is also worrying me. I dug this over a week ago, retaining a good size root ball. I did not try to mess with the roots at all, and have not fertilized yet. I actually brought it to an azalea workshop yesterday, but nothing big was removed. It was looking healthy yesterday, and the workshop teacher did not mention anything about it looking unhealthy, but this morning some of the leaves were brown. They are not dry, however. They are still soft and flexible. Any ideas will be much appreciated.
Thanks.
Nick.
 

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TheSteve

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You couldn't have gotten all the roots into that pot could you? my guess is transplant shock coupled by doing anything to it so soon. Shock usually takes a bit to show up and this seems fairly soon so I think you may have pushed it too soon.
 

noissee

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Thanks for the reply, I did some reading, and that does seem to be the only option. Should I continue holding off on the fert? Or would a lite feeding do it some good?
 

shohin kid

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All the the reading I have done says fertilizer is not a medicine. One should only use fertilizer on healthy trees.
Shohin Kid
 

noissee

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Shohin kid, that is my gut feeling. I have heard people say that fertilizer is always a good thing, and trees recover better with a little feeding. I am still skeptical about it though.
 

Glider

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Just for balance, I tend to follow the other side which basically says that if a plant is expected to recover and grow new, healthy tissue, it needs energy and something to build the new tissue with. This is particularly true of plants potted in inert media. Having said that, it should be a gentle fertilizer, but fertilizer nonetheless.
 

Dav4

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Just for balance, I tend to follow the other side which basically says that if a plant is expected to recover and grow new, healthy tissue, it needs energy and something to build the new tissue with. This is particularly true of plants potted in inert media. Having said that, it should be a gentle fertilizer, but fertilizer nonetheless.


My thoughts as well. Fertilizer applied to potted trees unable to utilize it due to compromised roots or other issues will eventually be washed out of the soil. Another point is that healthy soil has a huge microfauna population (bacteria, fungi, etc) that needs food, too. When you fertilize your tree, you are feeding your soil, and not just the tree.

Dave
 

october

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A sick tree should never be fertilized until it has somewhat recovered and started growing healthy new foliage........ I am speaking about SICK trees...Trees where parts are dying, leaves are browning and falling off and/or entire sections are yellowing and dying..

I hope this was helpful

Rob
 

Glider

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My thoughts as well. Fertilizer applied to potted trees unable to utilize it due to compromised roots or other issues will eventually be washed out of the soil. Another point is that healthy soil has a huge microfauna population (bacteria, fungi, etc) that needs food, too. When you fertilize your tree, you are feeding your soil, and not just the tree.

Dave
Yes, that's an extremely important point. Plants need healthy, active microfauna around their roots in exactly the same way as we need gut bacteria.
 

shohin kid

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Not only did I find my elm sickly this morning, but my azalea is also worrying me. I dug this over a week ago, retaining a good size root ball. I did not try to mess with the roots at all, and have not fertilized yet. I actually brought it to an azalea workshop yesterday, but nothing big was removed. It was looking healthy yesterday, and the workshop teacher did not mention anything about it looking unhealthy, but this morning some of the leaves were brown. They are not dry, however. They are still soft and flexible. Any ideas will be much appreciated.
Thanks.
Nick.

Is this a satsuki azalea?
 

noissee

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It is "red ruffle."

When I dug this up there was granular fert on the soil surface, and I did not wash out the old soil. Therefore, I should guess that there is still some fertilizer in the rootball that came with it.
 

rockm

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Overwatering, overattention

Are your two biggest problems. Leave the thing alone for a year. Don't do anything other than basic care--no fertilizer. Keep it watered, but not too wet.--Overwatering is the beginner's biggest collection hurdle. Damaged roots can't take water up, but must be kept moist to recover. Understanding the balance between overwatering and keeping the tree adequately water can take some time to learn. Some specimens can be lost in the process.

This tree shouldn't have seen a workshop for at least a year, probably two. Your instructor didn't do you any favors in working on it so soon after collection.
 

october

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This tree shouldn't have seen a workshop for at least a year, probably two. Your instructor didn't do you any favors in working on it so soon after collection

I think rockm has made a good point here. However, if when the tree was collected, you weere able to get the entire root ball...some work could be done.... I have heard of masters doing some, key word being some, work to a tree after it was collected, providing they were able to collect the entire root ball along with the tree.

Still, probably a good idea to wait a season...

Rob
 

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