Changing Vision

agraham

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First,let me once again thank everyone who responded to the "Talent=Vision?" thread.It was very helpful to me.Hopefully,it was and will continue to be to others,as well.

As a follow up.let me offer this scenario.

You've worked for quite a few years on a certain tree.You have your vision.You're getting there with the tree.All of a sudden,you think of a better direction to take....or at least think it's better.Do you ponder this new direction?Do you jump right in and start?Do you continue on until you have made the first idea come to fruition(to the best of your abilities)...knowing that you will be able to change the tree at a later date?

Unfortunately for me...I am constantly second guessing and tend to act on impulse.My trees change direction often.While I enjoy the initial process of choosing and taking off in a new direction,it can also become frustrating to always have trees in a state fo development instead of refinement.

Any thoughts?...suggestions?

andy
 
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ianb

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Hey Andy,

Again this is where the trusty sketchpad or photoshop comes in very handy. Make a sketch of each of your visions as you envision the "finished" product, but do be realistic and work within what the tree and species has to offer.

Once you have these it is normally fairly easy to determine which makes the better tree, then it should be full speed ahead to make that vision a reality.

Of course like all of us your taste/vision may change over the years then its back to the drawing board.

Hope this helps.
 

darrellw

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I basically agree with Ian. If I come up with what I think is a better vision/direction, I will think about it, explore, or ask others. But once I decide that the new direction is better, I would head off that way immediately (within the limits of the material to respond, of course). I believe this is natural and desirable, if you don't have a better/clearer idea about a tree this year than you did last year then you are not learning/progressing. The new direction could just be minor tweaks, or something radical. Of course, the more radical the more thought you should put into it before making a move!
 

Attila Soos

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I don't remember ever, a case when I had a new vision for a tree that was inferior to the old one. It was always better, so I went with it. This is especially true in the first 10 years, when the learning curve is steep.

But these days, when I already have many years over my first decade, usually the first impression is a good one, so I stick with it. However, this is true only with the trees that are in an advanced stage of development.

With material that is far away from being advanced, the vision is a very general one, with many open alternatives. I keep my options open, since the material is usually in the ground and can develop new features that didn't exist before. As the material getting closer and closer to maturity, the styling becomes more and more specific.

But I see nothing wrong with changing the vision any time, as long as it is reasonable to assume that it can be accomplished. And if the original vision is mediocre, and the new one is far superior, then I wouldn't hesitate to change direction, even if it took a long time. I don't want to have a large collection of mediocre albeit refined trees.
 

Vance Wood

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But I see nothing wrong with changing the vision any time, as long as it is reasonable to assume that it can be accomplished. And if the original vision is mediocre, and the new one is far superior, then I wouldn't hesitate to change direction, even if it took a long time. I don't want to have a large collection of mediocre albeit refined trees.

Yes, I can identify with this condition. Put a coat of paint on a pig and you will have a painted pig; but a pig none the less.

I have found in my own experience that the idea behind vision is more an exercise in seeing honestly. Often we will look at the design of a tree that we have been working on and discover, once the photos have been taken, that it is in the photo not exactly what you pictured with it right in front of you. It is the same device that works in the mind of those poor unfortunate Anorexic young ladies who stand in front of a mirror, nothing but skin and bones, to see a fat lady and continue to diet themselves to death.
 
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cascade

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Tilted visions..

Oh yeah..it is that who-ran-into-the-branch-of-my-tree-?-Uhhh-I-think-I styled-it-that-way-last-year feeling,isn't it..:D

-dorothy:)
 

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