Cherry species

Zappa

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What species of cherry are susceptible for leaf reduction? Ive tried Yoshino...they dont seem to reduce well...If possible I would like a species that tends to have dense blooms, and able to have it's leaves reduced. Any suggestions? I was thinking about seargent cherry....
 

AlainK

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I don't know if you can get some in Tennessee, but Prunus mahaleb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_mahaleb) is a favourite for bonsaï here in Europe : it is used as a "substitute" for Prunus mume which is very hard to find here, and most of the trees I have seen have a lot of dead wood.

There's a list of prunus from the new world here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus, maybe you can find a species that suits your area. Maybe some members in the forum have tried chokecherry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_virginiana), it seems to be an interesting species judging by the photo.
 
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What species of cherry are susceptible for leaf reduction? Ive tried Yoshino...they dont seem to reduce well...If possible I would like a species that tends to have dense blooms, and able to have it's leaves reduced. Any suggestions? I was thinking about seargent cherry....
I suppose that's a reasonable request but I don't know that anyone at the higher levels is actually growing them for foliage. I have one prunus mume which hasn't flowered yet, and its leaves got very ragged this summer. I am going to give it more protection next year but I don't know about leaf reduction.
 

Zappa

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not sure if you're doing this but I've had increased flowering of my yoshino when I switch to a high potassium fertilizer from mid/late summer-mid oct
 
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This was actually my first season for this tree, although it is old enough to flower.
 

AlainK

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I suppose that's a reasonable request but I don't know that anyone at the higher levels is actually growing them for foliage.
Yes, that's quite true, flowering ans dead wood are usually the main features of this kind of trees...
 

grog

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Mark Rockwell at BT speaks highly of black cherry, prunus serotina. I've a couple, but they're too young for me to make any meaningful comments on them.

I also have a nanking cherry which has leaves about 1" - 1 1/2" with no thoughts yet on working towards reducing leaf size.
 

Ashbarns

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I wonder if 'cherry plum' falls into this category as I have quite a few prunus cerasifira and prunus lindsayae which are collected trees. Some do flower but the beauty is in the small leafed foliage. I have never seen mine fruit but in the wild the fruit is small just like a cherry. The birds love them and I am told people make jelly from them.

Ash
 
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Ash,

That sounds like a interesting species. You collect these in the wild.... how do they respond to collecting and later, bonsai techniques?


Will
 

AlainK

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Yes, I forgot about prunus cerasifera. I have a couple in training, including the one pictured (Winter 2005, after collecting it, about 80 cm high)

When you look at the flowers (picture 2, Spring 2005), you understand it's an intersting species for bonsai.

The pb with prunus like this one is that they like a rather fresh soil, so leaf-scorching in the Summer is frequent. But again, leaves are not the main feature for this kind of trees.

Will,
They react well when potted, I use a mix of about 1/3 pumice, 1/3 pozzolane (lava rock) and 1/3 composted bark.
 
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Ashbarns

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Ash,

That sounds like a interesting species. You collect these in the wild.... how do they respond to collecting and later, bonsai techniques?

Will
Will
This species is native to Asia. Birds love the fruit and therefore an almost world wide dispersal of the tree exists. We had a very hot spring this time last year and I lost four of them (just re-potted) due to my being careless with watering. (we had level four water restrictions as well) They are prone to die-back on the trunk but are tough. Sure I enjoy the flowers but in full leaf, for me, they are at their best because the leaf size is so small. I was told years ago never try to defoliate as they don't like it. They grow in abundance here in the wild and I managed to get a few that were cattle cropped (on the other side of a fence). They are easily collected and I select single trunks and they do layer well if required. They prefer acidic soil conditions so I add a little peat moss to the mix and feed with a weak mix of miracid. They leaf burst before any other species closely followed by the tridents.


Ash :)
 
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anttal63

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yes ash i know the type ya talkn about they are everywhere i must get me some. do you think its too late now to collect them. they ramify very well too yea?
 

Ashbarns

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Tony they do ramify very well. It may not be too late if leaf burst hasn't happened but you will have to be quick. What we used to do was select the ones we are going to dig cut them back and put a little tape around the trunk to identify them for the following spring. That is if it is too late to dig now.You can even undercut them at the same time.

Ash :D
 
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Yes, I forgot about prunus cerasifera. I have a couple in training, including the one pictured (Winter 2005, after collecting it, about 80 cm high)

When you look at the flowers (picture 2, Spring 2005), you understand it's an intersting species for bonsai.

The pb with prunus like this one is that they like a rather fresh soil, so leaf-scorching in the Summer is frequent. But again, leaves are not the main feature for this kind of trees.
Alain, thank you for such lovely photos! The attraction is obvious!
 
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Ashbarns,

Thank you for taking the time to post that information and sharing your knowledge on that species with us.

Will
 

irene_b

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Tony they do ramify very well. It may not be too late if leaf burst hasn't happened but you will have to be quick. What we used to do was select the ones we are going to dig cut them back and put a little tape around the trunk to identify them for the following spring. That is if it is too late to dig now.You can even undercut them at the same time.

Ash :D



Come on now Ash! Show us some pics!
Mom
 

Ashbarns

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Ok Irene here's a couple. The larger slanting one has flowers on the top and this will be reduced in height soon. This was also layered a few years ago due to an inverted trunk. The smaller one has very aged bark but the pic fails to get the movement in the branches. My photographic skills are improving, getting a tripod soon.

Ash
 

BONSAI_OUTLAW

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Ash...I like that tree. Thank you for showing it.


Has anyone worked with Prunus cisterna aka The Purpleleaf Sand Cherry?


(I picked one up awhile back for a good price. It was an impulse buy due to how much I liked the trunk. I figured at the time that if it made for a good bonsai subject then so be t and if not then I would like to have it in my yard.)
 
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