couple of jade trees

anttal63

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heres a couple of jade trees that belong to mates of mine. i was once sceptical of this plant as bonsai. sorry for the poor quality photo's best i could do at the club rooms.:)
 

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Very nice Jades and a pleasant break away from what this species is usually styled like.




Will
 

greerhw

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I've never seen a jade look that good, tell your mates for me, they have the touch.

keep it green,
Harry
 

Si Nguyen

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Nice jades Antonio! I have never seen them quite like that either! I have got a few of them that I was aiming for a boabab look but that's going nowhere fast. Time to rethink about these!
Si
 

rosieface

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Sifting through this thread because jade plants grow like crazy around here so I thought I'd try cultivating a few for practice.

Thing is, I don't much care for jade aesthetically in general; but these are just gorgeous. I think the main difference is leaf size. Does anybody know how to get the leaves that small? The jade plants around here are shrubs and their leaves are much larger.

Thanks!
 

007

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Sifting through this thread because jade plants grow like crazy around here so I thought I'd try cultivating a few for practice.

Thing is, I don't much care for jade aesthetically in general; but these are just gorgeous. I think the main difference is leaf size. Does anybody know how to get the leaves that small? The jade plants around here are shrubs and their leaves are much larger.

Thanks!

Different species of jade. Most are the large leaf variety, however, occasionally you'll find one that is a dwarf. There's a HUGE one down the street from me that I have been tempted to take a cutting or two from as I pass by.
 

rosieface

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Hmm. I'll have to keep my eyes peeled for a dwarf jade I can steal a leaf or two from. :rolleyes:
 

treebeard55

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Excellent job on your friend's trees! Best Portulacaria bonsai I've ever seen, period. :)

These are Portulacaria, not Crassula. That's the normal leaf size for the species. Common names include, yes "dwarf jade;" also "baby jade." In its native range it's often called "elephant bush," because elephants find it a tasty snack. That's my own preferred common name for it, partly to distinguish it from Crassula "jade."
 

mat

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Here's a big one from this year's BSF show.

I have a bunch of little ones. It's a very easy species to propagate via cuttings.
 

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mat

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Another big one. Jim Smith's.
 

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rockm

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WOW :D:eek: Very Nice tree. Is it planted over a rock? can't really tell...
 

Bill S

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I have a starter one of these, is it ok to chop everything back to the trunk, from what I have seen it's yes, but it would be nice for a confirmation.

I did see they root as cuttings from branches or leaves easily.

Two very nice examples above.
 

Attila Soos

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I have a starter one of these, is it ok to chop everything back to the trunk, from what I have seen it's yes, but it would be nice for a confirmation.

I did see they root as cuttings from branches or leaves easily.

Two very nice examples above.

The best way to start such a bonsai, is to find a landscape specimen, and take a cutting as large as you can find. It can be as thick as your biceps, or bigger. It's like modelling clay, you can cut and shape any way you want. It only has two enemies: cold and heavy soil.

(Here in L.A., it often happens that when a large branch is cut off and left on the ground (in semi-shade), it roots within a few weeks.)
 
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Bill S

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Guess next time I make it out to the land of warmth, I'll keep an eye out, thanks for the info.
I have to deal with lanky winter growth, then fix it in the spring, zone 5, It was a gift, I'd gone for a shimp, but what are you going to do, especially when from the wife.
 

treebeard55

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Where'd Jim get that funky sun helmet? I like!

Bill, I have the same problem with lanky winter growth. Unless/until I'm ever able to afford metal-halide lights, I don't see a way around that.

Portulacaria is a great species for beginners, especially children. Besides forgiving neglect, it grows quickly enough for results to be seen relatively soon, keeping a kid's interest. :)
 

mat

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WOW :D:eek: Very Nice tree. Is it planted over a rock? can't really tell...

I talked to Jim about this tree today (It wasn't at his nursery. It's now down at Heathcote gardens). He confirmed that it is growing over a rock. Like most of his stuff, he's made this via clip & grow - no wiring. It seems to be one of his favorite species. My dad took home a nice one for $65.
 

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