Dormant spray - what do you use (if anything)?

darrellw

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Ok, I'm thinking about applying a dormant spray. For folks that do this, what do you use? Do you use it on all trees?
 

Fred-4-u

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I use "jin-seal" ( lime- sulpher ?) on my trees.

On conifers : 1 part on 40 parts of water
Decidious : 1 part on 30 parts of water
 

ianb

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I also use lime sulphur but at 1:20 ratio (its what it says on the bottle), making sure not to get it on the soil of potted trees though.

Also 1 month later I apply a winter oil spray.

Cheers
Ian
 

bisjoe

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Interesting question. I even have apple tree bonsai, and have only ever sprayed with fungicide for powdery mildew when they got it a few times. They just don't seem ever have the disease or pest issues that the garden trees do.
 

JoeR

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I use "jin-seal" ( lime- sulpher ?) on my trees.

On conifers : 1 part on 40 parts of water
Decidious : 1 part on 30 parts of water
Does anyone else use Jin Seal? It says not for any other purpose besides bleaching deadwood, but I’d like to know if It’s the same stuff used for dormant spraying. Can anyone confirm if it’s safe and if the above stated dilution is accurate?
 

ysrgrathe

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I use daconil + horticultural oil then 1 month later 30:1 lime sulfur with horticultural oil. I used to use neem but it tends to clog my sprayer.

If Jin Seal is ~29% lime sulfur then it should be fine to use for dormant spray.
 
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Does anyone else use Jin Seal? It says not for any other purpose besides bleaching deadwood, but I’d like to know if It’s the same stuff used for dormant spraying. Can anyone confirm if it’s safe and if the above stated dilution is accurate?
Walter Pall uses it at similar dilution, per him on this forum.
 

Japonicus

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@markyscott I'm curious, why do you instruct that oil and fungicide should be applied separately at different times?
Since discontinued, I still have a bottle of Volck Oil spray by Ortho.
Instructions say During the growing season, do not apply to foliage within 30 days
before or after using products containing sulphur, lime sulphur or captan.
It does not say why though, and I would follow those instructions in dormancy as well
erring on the cautious side. Besides, it states for dormant spraying, to use late Winter, early Spring.
Nothing about as we enter dormancy...
 

Japonicus

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Oh and very important to add +
The only DO NOT USE ON plants listed are
Maidenhair ferns, Red or Japanese Maples and non woody plants.
That's Volck Oil, not sure how the properties vary from neem oil or
other horticultural oils. I mention this part since JM are a huge part of bonsai
and landscapes as well. I would think it to be safe on the JM after leaf drop
but would not per these instructions, or you're familiar with someone who does it
successfully proven.
 

ysrgrathe

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@Japonicus ah thanks. This is an important point: sulfur (in any form -- liquid, wettable powder or powder) and oil should not be applied at the same time (or within 30 days) to plants in leaf. For dormant deciduous trees, I think it is OK, but the mix should never be applied to evergreens, because they are never out of leaf.
 

Japonicus

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@Japonicus ah thanks. This is an important point: sulfur (in any form -- liquid, wettable powder or powder) and oil should not be applied at the same time (or within 30 days) to plants in leaf. For dormant deciduous trees, I think it is OK, but the mix should never be applied to evergreens, because they are never out of leaf.
True that. My suspicion about the JM being tolerant after leaf fall, speaks nothing of the new leaf emergence in Spring being subjected to traces of the oil left behind. Particularly per user instructions of late Winter early Spring.
Leo mentioned in my thread about using last years mulch, that dormant oil is usually used
on deciduous rather than conifers. I've used it on my procumbens which alters the colour
until new growth resumes in Spring. Other than that, procumbens weathers it just fine.
I treated the ground in my Wintering area with lawn granules of both MoleMax and insect control.
Added that to the mulch as well, and will simply apply a "night cap" of Malathion once all
my trees are mulched and in place. 63ºF tomorrow, mid teens Thurs night. I foresee some action in my near future.
Oh, I'm off work tomorrow...nice!
 

markyscott

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@markyscott I'm curious, why do you instruct that oil and fungicide should be applied separately at different times?

Horticultural oil is reportedly not compatible with many fungicides, including lime sulfur. Their application should be separated by a few weeks.

S
 
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markyscott

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The only DO NOT USE ON plants listed are
Maidenhair ferns, Red or Japanese Maples and non woody plants.

I’ve been using All-Seasons Horticultural Oil. They caution against application on Maidenhair Ferns as well, but do not mention Japanese maple. I’ve also heard that Bald Cypress may be sensitive as well. However, I believe those cautions apply when the tree is in leaf. Your mileage may vary, but I’ve sprayed both species in dormancy for years and the trees have all done well the following spring.

S
 

Japonicus

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I’ve been using All-Seasons Horticultural Oil. They caution against application on Maidenhair Ferns as well, but do not mention Japanese maple. I’ve also heard that Bald Cypress may be sensitive as well. However, I believe those cautions apply when the tree is in leaf. Your mileage may vary, but I’ve sprayed both species in dormancy for years and the trees have all done well the following spring.

S
Sorry for the duplicate question. Actually, it's a good thing to have that info in your thread
if you had folks that were familiar with only the Volck dormant oil directions, then read through
your thread thinking all dormant oil is alike. I'm reusing last years mulch and started to use this oil.
I had questions about WP, BP, EWP, Blue Cedar, Hinoki...so rather than test the waters and invite damage
I opted to omit it this year.
 

ysrgrathe

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There are many types of oil, it's important to read the labels carefully. IIRC all oils will ruin the color of "blue" evergreens, use with caution! (it's just cosmetic, but I think the change is permanent until the foliage is replaced)
 

0soyoung

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eb84327

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Does anyone else use Jin Seal? It says not for any other purpose besides bleaching deadwood, but I’d like to know if It’s the same stuff used for dormant spraying. Can anyone confirm if it’s safe and if the above stated dilution is accurate?


jin seal that is made out of lime sulfur can be used for fungicide. some countries sell lime sulfur even labeled as such.
 

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