Fresh From The Field

Tachigi

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Hi All, Started autum collecting yesterday and thought I'd share

Tree #1
 

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Tachigi

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Yew Tree #2
 

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Tachigi

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Yew Tree#3
 

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Tachigi

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Yew # 4 This big boy was the better part of 3 hours to get out

Edit: Lost the second picture so here it is.
 

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Martin Sweeney

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Tachigi,

Are these trees coming from your own growing field(s)?

Regards,
Martin
 

Tachigi

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Yew # 5 which made for a long day of potting
 

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Tachigi

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Hi Martin,
NO, I wasn't born when most of these germinated. They are anywhere from 40 to 60 years of age. They are all yamadori with big frig'n tap roots (OH my aching back) ;)
 

BigBill

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Very nice Tom. if you decide to part with any of them send me a PM.
 

Tachigi

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Hiya Bill,

Glad to see your still around.

I will part with all of them hopefully next year as soon as they get there pretty little price tags.
 

BigBill

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Yep Im just reading and learning, when there is something worth reading. And always keeping an eye out for better stock to replace my crapsai. Ive tossed a few, planted a few. Live and learn
 

Vance Wood

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I am assuming that you have done this before, collected Yew in particular and conifers in general in the fall season? What is your success ratio? I am not challenging you or trying to put you on the spot, I too look to learn a few things when possible.
 

Tachigi

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What is your success ratio?
Hi Vance, I am proud to say that my collection ratio for yews is 100% fall and spring. My collection procedures are a bit different in the fall than spring. Instead of bare rooting as I do in spring I'll leave about 30% of native soil when potting. In some cases, not all, I will prune and root cut in spring for a fall removal leaving only some tap like roots, as I did with the two large pieces pictured above. Typically I do this with large material. Not only does it help tremendously with root growth but with back budding as well. However, my wife says that is all malarkey. She says the truth is I'm to tired after digging some of these big bruisers to lift them and carry them down the mountain to the truck. :) Finally, here in this location the window for fall collection is quite small. Typically from mid-September through the first week maybe second week in October depending on temperatures. Of course all items collected in fall receive special care over winter to protect them. They all get a enclosure and a solution made by Roots that prevents frost and soil from freezing as long as it doesn't get down into the mid teens.

As for other conifers? I have not tried collecting any other conifer in the fall. My eye is on other species that I have had success with this time of year.
 

Vance Wood

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Hi Tom:

Thanks for the info. I've been thinking about grabbing a few things this fall and wanted to see what your method and success was.
 
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I have never had yew material, but it can be found in the woods near here, so I am looking to acquire some someday, is it similar to any other species in regards to working with (pinching, back budding, cuttings, and so on)
 

Tachigi

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I have never had yew material, but it can be found in the woods near here, so I am looking to acquire some someday, is it similar to any other species in regards to working with (pinching, back budding, cuttings, and so on)

It is my felling that Yews should be a must have in anyone's collection that plays with conifers. In the discussion of what is the best material a beginner can start with. Junipers are usually the number one choice and I've never heard or read yews being suggested. In my opinion Yews should be the number one choice. They generate masses of fine feeder roots at the base of the trunk. They are very drought tolerant and can handle over watering to a degree. They bud back profusely on old wood. In general they can handle a fair amount of abuse. The perfect tree for someone getting into the bonsai game or a gem of a tree for the old vet that can speed up it development.

As being able similar to other species the closet I would say is pine. In spring to get back budding you needle pluck about a third of the needles behind a bud that is ready to open. You then pinch that bud just as the feathery tip separates. This produces a flush of new buds further back down the line. You get a second flush later on in the spring from this procedure. Then every other year you then can pinch the bud tip (not the whole bud) on this second flush to get yet another flush. So in very short order you can have a very full canopy. I have never tried air layering, cuttings, or grafts on yews simply because the procedure I described above, there was no need. Finally one of the greatest attributes of yews is its wood. Carving is a pure pleasure with this species. If you think about it some of the best carved pieces come from yews. I site the Ginkgo awards as a case in point. If you silk carve the wood is very fibrous and pulls easily to leave a marvelous textured surface. If you carve on original deadwood it to works quite well and the grain is easy to see and follow. The wood is very hard when dried and preserves and seasons well.

I suggest at the first opportunity that you go up into those woods you talked about and find yourself one:)
 

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