Ginkgo styling methods

riprap

Sapling
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Hello, I am looking for resources about the procedures for styling a ginkgo in the classic, upright style -- columnar trunk with a profusion of upward-striking small branches.

Obviously, the first step is to have freely-budding material. I've got that. The point is what to do next!

Thanks for any pointers.
 

grog

Shohin
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I think the best I've found on the net is
http://www.xs4all.nl/~kwanten/bonsai.htm

Personally I had a dismal survival rate from last winter here in Iowa and am a bit disenchanted with them at the moment. I overwintered about fifteen of them outside mulched in and on the south side of the house. The two that survived were cuttings I'd taken last spring which is interesting since most of the time older more established material is hardier. In the case of the ginkgo however I believe that the fleshy roots they develop were more vulnerable to the cold.
 

riprap

Sapling
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I think the best I've found on the net is
http://www.xs4all.nl/~kwanten/bonsai.htm

Personally I had a dismal survival rate from last winter here in Iowa and am a bit disenchanted with them at the moment.[...]
Thank you for the pointer to that useful information. I like the challenge the species presents, because so many of our usual arsenal of procedures (wiring, chopping, developing a whole new set of branches) don't apply, or apply in a very limited sense.

No "Iowa winters" here in San Francisco (mean winter temp is <10 degrees F cooler than mean summer temp). I've had pretty good survivorship, but nothing that could be called a trained bonsai yet.
 

Driftwood

Mame
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Hello, I am looking for resources about the procedures for styling a ginkgo in the classic, upright style -- columnar trunk with a profusion of upward-striking small branches.

Obviously, the first step is to have freely-budding material. I've got that. The point is what to do next!

Hi, after more than 10 years and hoping you still around, could you share what you have learned plz. Looking at full size old ginkgo trees pictures it seems like not many keep that columnar trunk but more upright big branches king of short trunk broom style.

Thanks for any pointers.
 

Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
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If you’re going for this style, it’s just a matter of grow and prune back. They kind of just grow this way in a pot. This one has never had a scrap of wire in it’s 23 years. They’re great trees, but not super exciting to grow.?
231232A3-D1D7-4CE2-A651-2A41F43CDBFD.jpeg
 

Driftwood

Mame
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If you’re going for this style, it’s just a matter of grow and prune back. They kind of just grow this way in a pot. This one has never had a scrap of wire in it’s 23 years. They’re great trees, but not super exciting to grow.?
View attachment 234117
It looks like Brians Ginkgo is a chichi, I guess they tend to grow diagonal? Unfortunately I still don't know my ginkgo variety but branches are more vertical, I'm trying with some rubber pads to open it a bit more.
 

Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
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It looks like Brians Ginkgo is a chichi, I guess they tend to grow diagonal? Unfortunately I still don't know my ginkgo variety but branches are more vertical, I'm trying with some rubber pads to open it a bit more.
Mine is a seedling, so it has no named variety. Branches tend to grow up and out. Share pix if you want styling tips.
 
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