Here's the Dead Tree and new tree Photos of the JWP I asked about in the other thread

junmilo

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Hi all

This is the new JWP tree Root so is it grafted or not?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/54186040@N06/5715780725/

Here are some photos of the new JWP with flowers and new needles shooting out of the candles...i just noticed that there's a lot of pollen around the pink flowers..when i blow into them..it's a yellowish dust flying all over the place...><'...i'm allergic to flower pollen, i hope i'm not allergic to pine pollen..
here are the photos
http://www.flickr.com/photos/54186040@N06/5715780703/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/54186040@N06/5715780753/

This is the first JWP i had..and the photos...of before and after...

When i got it all the needles were Green and healthy...
here are the photos..
http://www.flickr.com/photos/54186040@N06/5716343878/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/54186040@N06/5716343840/
All the branches were crispy when the spring came..they were easily snapped of..like when u snap a pencil into two

Here's a photo of that grafting I tried on the dead? half alive JWP..
http://www.flickr.com/photos/54186040@N06/5715780669/

Please i know that i did wrong things before..I'm sorry....please i'm just here to learn from my mistakes...

Thank You for all of your help

J
 
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tanlu

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No need to say sorry. You did what you thought was best at the time.

I think you should start off with better material. 1st, the most important and most difficult part to change on a tree is the nebari--root crown at the base of the trunk. Everything else comes after that. Read Brent Walston's articles on evergreengardenworks.com
You need to learn the basics before you start doing advanced techniques like grafting. That being said, I don't think grafting a piece of live foliage to a dead tree will do you any good either.

by the way, I really liked your tortoises!

T
 
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rockm

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The pine you show is dead. It cannot support the graft you have placed on it...Unless the portion of the trunk you grafted it to has some functioning tissue. That is very unlikely looking at the main tree, as it apparently had no green growth left on it. Once a conifer loses all of its green, it's a goner in a short period of time.

Your graft may continue on for while being green using up nutrients already in its own tissues, but it won't make it long.

Sorry. That's just the way it works...:eek:
 

junmilo

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The pine you show is dead. It cannot support the graft you have placed on it...Unless the portion of the trunk you grafted it to has some functioning tissue. That is very unlikely looking at the main tree, as it apparently had no green growth left on it. Once a conifer loses all of its green, it's a goner in a short period of time.

Your graft may continue on for while being green using up nutrients already in its own tissues, but it won't make it long.

Sorry. That's just the way it works...:eek:

The Thing is, when i tried to graft the live branch onto the dead looking tree...when i cut the skin off the dead tree...i see a lot of green tissues...so does that mean it can still be alive?

thanks
 

junmilo

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No need to say sorry. You did what you thought was best at the time.

I think you should start off with better material. 1st, the most important and most difficult part to change on a tree is the nebari--root crown at the base of the trunk. Everything else comes after that. Read Brent Walston's articles on evergreengardenworks.com
You need to learn the basics before you start doing advanced techniques like grafting. That being said, I don't think grafting a piece of live foliage to a dead tree will do you any good either.

by the way, I really liked your tortoises!

T

Hi Tanlu

Thanks for the information. I was curious..from the photos...is that tree grafted?

Thanks

J
 

treebeard55

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... when i cut the skin off the dead tree...i see a lot of green tissues...so does that mean it can still be alive? ...

Unlike animals, trees don't die all at once: some parts of the tree can live for weeks after other parts are dead. So a scratch test can still show green under the bark of the trunk, when the roots have already given up the ghost.

Rock's right, I'm afraid: most pines don't survive after losing all foliage. That's true of most other conifers, too.

As Tanlu implied, we're all here to learn from each other, and we've all been new to bonsai at one time or another. I've killed more trees in 22 years than I like to remember. But mistakes can do some good if we make the effort to learn from them. Or, as John Naka put it, mistakes are part of the tuition we pay for learning bonsai!

You might want to add your location to your public profile. General terms are enough, like "northern Illinois" or "Irish midlands." Location gives others some idea of what your climate is like, and lets us give better-informed answers to some of your questions.
 

junmilo

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Unlike animals, trees don't die all at once: some parts of the tree can live for weeks after other parts are dead. So a scratch test can still show green under the bark of the trunk, when the roots have already given up the ghost.

Rock's right, I'm afraid: most pines don't survive after losing all foliage. That's true of most other conifers, too.

As Tanlu implied, we're all here to learn from each other, and we've all been new to bonsai at one time or another. I've killed more trees in 22 years than I like to remember. But mistakes can do some good if we make the effort to learn from them. Or, as John Naka put it, mistakes are part of the tuition we pay for learning bonsai!

You might want to add your location to your public profile. General terms are enough, like "northern Illinois" or "Irish midlands." Location gives others some idea of what your climate is like, and lets us give better-informed answers to some of your questions.

I'm from Southern Ontario, Canada
 

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