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mersino

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can anyone tell me what this is? we have tons of these at my work but i have no idea what it is let alone if it is bonsai material. help wanted
 

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rockm

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This MIGHT be a chinese elm. Where is it growing?
 

plant_dr

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I'd vote for elm too, but the first picture of the bark is throwing me off.
 

rockm

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the bark is actually what makes me think it's a Chinese elm. C. Elm (ulmus parvifolia) is also known and sold by landscape nurseries as "lacebark elm" as the bark exfoliates in attractive irregular patterns like this.

http://img231.imageshack.us/i/bark.jpg/sr=1
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3433/3778932582_99287f6cb9_z.jpg
http://www.wemoss.org/images/jan09/ulmus_parvifolia/ulmus_parviflora_bark.jpg

A mature Chinese elm in a landscape is very striking, even though we're used to seeing it as bonsai. There are quite a few in neighborhoods around here in N.Va. Some are even used as roadside trees because they're so tough.
 

mersino

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rockm, you definitely got it! i checked out the links you posted and its spot on. we have 4 huge ones at work and a couple that have sprouted near them and the landscapers were about to dig them up last week. The best part is they have a 3" base and good taper. So i checked with my boss to see if i could take them and he had no problems with that. Do you have any collecting tip for these?
 

rockm

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You can probably dig the thing out, trunk chop it, remove most of the roots (keep a few feeders if you can close in towards the trunk--these usually have a few thinner ropy roots that can be wound into a pot after collection), bareroot it of all soil (using a hose) and put it in a growing container with bonsai soil.

Chinese elm, like most elms, are very tough customers and vigorous. I don't think you will have any problem with re-rooting one of these that's been in the ground. It will have a lot of stored energy to push new growth with.
 

mersino

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thanks rockm, i'll update when the project is complete
 

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