Identify this wilding?

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I dug this tree at about 3500 ft. ele. in the SW Virginia mountains three years ago. It is developing into a nice cascade.

However, I have no idea what it is. I live in the Piedmont area of NC and see these small trees growing in this area also. Generally they are no taller than 8 ft. Tend to branch close to the ground and grow quite thick. I usually run across them in areas where there were old homesteads. Could have been a domestic plant gone wild.

In the spring I have seen them bloom, mine hasn't yet but I am still cutting back new growth for ramification. The bloom looks like a small trumpet with the bell as a four point star. A very light yellow or cream color. Don't know if it is a male and female plant or if all bloom and bear fruit.

The three photos attached are of the plant in question, the leaves of the plant and today I ran across one in the woods with it's fruit. The fruit have a large single seed in side, like a peach. Not much flesh over it. When you bite one you get a very pleasant sweet citrus flavor and then astringency, that is your tongue and teeth feel hairy. What little flesh is over the seed is very juicy but there ain't much flesh so it doesn't last long.

I have looked and looked for an ID of this. So far, no luck. For certain it is not a wild blueberry, though the leaves kind of resemble that.

Does anyone have any ideas?
 

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Martin Sweeney

Chumono
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Mac,

The leaves look like eleagnus, the berries look like russian olive.

Regards,
Martin
 

Martin Sweeney

Chumono
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Mac,

Quick look on google reveals that russian olive is an eleagnus, so there you go. Invasive specie, so give it hell.

Regards,
Martin
 
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I think y'all have led me to it. I looked over the Russian Olive info and it mentioned Autumn Olive, Elaeagnus umbellata as being another version of the same plant..

I have looked at Autumn Olive pictures and description on the net and I am fairly certain that is what it is. I'll go back in a few weeks when the fruit are closer to ripe and take another look at them. The Russian Olive description doesn't match and the leaves don't look quite right.

Autumn Olive it is and I am sticking to it.

The fruit (pulp and seed) are actually quite healthy to eat I see, 7 times more Lycopene than tomatoes and rich in proteins.

This web site has very good photos of the plant and seeing them confirms what I have:]

http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Elaeagnus+umbellata

Thanks to all for giving me the direction.
 

digger714

Shohin
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Ive seen these around also, and always wondered what they were, so thanks for putting this up. Im in mooresville close to big daddys seafood restaurant. where are you?
 
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