Making a LARGE custom pot

Dale Cochoy

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Crackpot

I thought I would also post this picture I took this morning 12/19/07 as I unloaded a bisque kiln full of future (hopefully) commissioned Christmas presents for customers.
I took this for all the newbies that are thinking about making a million $ producing large quality hand-made pots and selling them on the net.
They say a picture is worth a thousand words, well, This picture pretty much explains just how easy this all is!
This was a pot made from about 25 pounds of clay, with a few hours in throwing it and then neatly trimming. Then a couple weeks of drying. It took up most of a kiln shelf before firing ( note size on ruler) and came out of bisque with a crack running clear across it.
I took this picture for you just before I threw it in the trash!:mad:
Regards,
Dale
 

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I thought I would also post this picture I took this morning 12/19/07 as I unloaded a bisque kiln full of future (hopefully) commissioned Christmas presents for customers.
I took this for all the newbies that are thinking about making a million $ producing large quality hand-made pots and selling them on the net.
They say a picture is worth a thousand words, well, This picture pretty much explains just how easy this all is!
This was a pot made from about 25 pounds of clay, with a few hours in throwing it and then neatly trimming. Then a couple weeks of drying. It took up most of a kiln shelf before firing ( note size on ruler) and came out of bisque with a crack running clear across it.
I took this picture for you just before I threw it in the trash!:mad:
Regards,
Dale
So you're saying there's a chance?
 

Smoke

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Dale, you have to turn lemons into lemonade.

You see "trash can"

I see bags of "Dale Cochoy high fired soil fixins".


(Thats Ok I make bags of hamster bedding out of mine)

Peace, Al
 

Salvelinus

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Awesome thread, Dale. Thanks for sharing. I haven't thrown since high school, and had thought about taking a college course, but maybe I'll wait until the kids have grown . . . ;)

Beautiful pots, even the cracked one. You have an awesome gift.
 

irene_b

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Dale, Thank You very much for explaining this in greater detail (and you to Emil for the link) makes the cost paid for a custom pot a lot more understandable.
I still have a few more questions but I need more coffee to fire the brain into gear.
Irene
 

irene_b

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There are many reasons a pot can be ruined along it's journey through making, drying, firing, glazing. They are ALL upsetting but moreso in the last step.

Can you explain what you mean by the last item glazing?
Is this coloring?
And how is a pot glazed?
Irene

(on second cup of coffee)
3 cups to make me a human
 

Dale Cochoy

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Yes, Irene, the glazing is the colored glassy coating which is applied by dipping, pouring, brushing or spraying. I listed it in the steps as it is done in the last firing. The gist of the post was that it hurts most when the pot goes bad in the last step.:(
 

pjkatich

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Irene,

I may be able to answer a few of your questions.

The term "glazing" refers to the application of chemical compounds to unfired (bone dry) or partially fired (bisqued) pieces of ceramic ware. These chemical compounds are what produce the different colors, textures, and surface characteristics on the finished products.

Due to the fragile nature of unfired (bone dry) clay, most potters partially fire (bisque) their pieces before applying the glazing compounds. A normal bisque firing is done to cone 04. A piece of bisqued ware is very similar to terra cotta. It is porous (which helps absorb the water from the glaze) and stable (hard) enough to be handled during the glazing process without a great deal of fear.

Glaze can be applied in a number of ways: Sprayed, brushed, dipped, poured, sponged, and dripped to name a few. The application method depends on the potter and what they are trying to accomplish with the particular piece they are glazing.

I hope this helps.

Best wishes,
Paul

Sorry Dale,

Did not see your post before I started this reply. Thanks for sharing.

Paul
 
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Taylor Brown

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Mr. Dale that is so awesome. I always wondered how that was done. It looks like a lot of hard work because you never smile. Dad is like that sometimes when he concentrates and even says a bad word or two :). How much does a kiln cost. I would like to try that and see if I would be any good. Thank you for sharing this I learned a lot.
 
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Mr. Dale that is so awesome. I always wondered how that was done. It looks like a lot of hard work because you never smile. Dad is like that sometimes when he concentrates and even says a bad word or two :). How much does a kiln cost. I would like to try that and see if I would be any good. Thank you for sharing this I learned a lot.
Oh, Man! Taylor, your dad has his work cut out for him with you coming up! From what I have seen of your artistic possibilities, I would say that only your level of desire would make the difference. In other words, you could be very good at any artistic endeavor. You just need to get started with it.
 

Graydon

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Dale, you have to turn lemons into lemonade.

You see "trash can"

I see bags of "Dale Cochoy high fired soil fixins".

Peace, Al
Yeah, I like that idea. Right now I have an "unfinished" box of Jim Barrett high fired soil fixins I brought back from the GSBF.
 

Dale Cochoy

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Mr. Dale that is so awesome. I always wondered how that was done. It looks like a lot of hard work because you never smile. Dad is like that sometimes when he concentrates and even says a bad word or two :). How much does a kiln cost. I would like to try that and see if I would be any good. Thank you for sharing this I learned a lot.
Thanks Taylor,
You asked an interesting question .
The medium sized electric kiln that I use to bisque most things and also to high fire costs ABOUT $1,500. But, that is only part of it. You must run a 220 volt line with breaker and plug. That is a few hundred more. Then you must buy all the "furniture" for the kiln ( shelves, posts, etc) and that can easily run another $500 for a medium kiln. Then there are tools, glaze chemicals,clay, etc.
My gas kiln which required a shed/deck built for it outside, gas line and vent system ( It uses a flame unlike the electric kiln which is like a big toaster ) is more expensive to build. Since it uses a flame there are many safety precautions to take and you must vent out the fumes and gases. Pretty much like the furnace in your home, but larger! I have a total of about $5,000 in its installation before I fired my first pot.
Many schools have ceramic classes, perhaps there is one near you.

Also Taylor, I NEVER say bad words! ;)

Dale
 

Bill S

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He He Dale you now have Toms head spinning, he's gonna need to sell a few bags of soil to keep up with Taylor, language rehab too.:D , thats OK tom mines 2 1/2 and I'm trying like HEck.

I'm with that part about try some classes first, as Toms BP comes down 30- 40 points. Sigh.
 

johng

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Hey Taylor, I work in an elementary school and I would be willing to bet that your art teacher either has or has access to a kiln. If I were you, I would take a chance and ask her/him about it...the worst they could say would be no. However, if they have access and you have a desire to learn, I bet they would willing to help and provide all the materials and guidance you need to learn a little about making pottery.

Dale, thanks for a great thread! We all appreciate the time and effort it takes to put together an educational post like yours. THANK YOU... and BTW I love the pots I got from you in Asheville...just wishing I would have bought all the ones I was considering.
John
 

Dale Cochoy

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Still making pots!
You can follow me on FACEBOOK at pages DALE COCHOY or WILD THINGS BONSAI STUDIO, also on The Internet Bonsai Club "Pottery" forum.

D.
 

milehigh_7

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Dale so great to see you posting over here. Don't be a stranger!
 

Dale Cochoy

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Thanks,
Rob, I just thought I'd stop in after about 4-5 years and let folks know I'm still alive.

I don't know if anything much has changed here since I left?
I wonder what happened to the half dozen guys that ruined the site back then and if it's being moderated now??

Follow me on Facebook.

D.
 

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misfit11

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Thanks,
I don't know if anything much has changed here since I left?
I wonder what happened to the half dozen guys that ruined the site back then and if it's being moderated now??
Well... There's no Karaoke Bar anymore :rolleyes: (if that's what you mean). I think it's a blessing to most and and viewed as fascist censorship to a select few others.

Great to see you on here, Dale. You're a very respected individual in the bonsai community. I'm glad to see you're doing well.:)

Cory
 

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