my list of heat tolerant species

jferrier

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Well here in TX we have had the worst drought in our recorded history and have broken many previous high temp records as well with no signs of relief in sight. I water 3 times a day and soil is drying between waterings and this is with most of them in the shade. So for those of you in the warmer areas of the US, I wanted to share what species have done well and which ones are struggling.

These species have not seemed to suffer at all:

Trident maple
Buttonwood- has grown like a weed in full sun
pinus thunbergii
a.p. "Shin Deshojo"
cedrus deodara-
cedrus atlantica
juniperus chinensis "shimpaku"
podocarpus macrophyllus
sequoia sempervirens- much to my surprise has zero heat damage though I keep them misted regularly


These have had some browning/burnt leaves but still healthy:

Acer palmatum- plain green
Acer Palmatum dissectum "Red Dragon"
a.p. dissectum " Inaba Shidare"
a.p. dissectum "Crimson Queen"
pinus edulis
a.p. "bloodgood"
chaenomeles japonica "Texas Scarlet"


These have browned badly and have lots of dried up leaves

a.p. " kamagata"
a.p. "germaines gyration"
taxodium distichum (about half of them are only mildly browned)
 

Woody

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That's interesting list you got there.
I would have thought that the cedar species you got would be be well and truly out of typical climate range. The atlas cedar particularly. Atlas cedars are supposedly drought resistant when established but that's for in ground trees. In bonsai pots, the heat you guys are getting in Texas at the moment should have cooked the roots or at least slow roasted them. What's your secret? Tell me do you find humidity to be a problem for your cedars?

I've similar experiences with Shimpakus in a hot climate not being problematic. I've also seen Podocarpus grown in other tropical countries (e.g Vietnam and Singapore) where seem to thrive in pot culture as bonsai and just simply as potted garden trees.

I'm not surprised by your experience of JBPs however. Where I'm situated in Australia, we get a climate with temps reaching in the 90s for 3-4 months of the year with humidity and lots of rain. This is supposed to be against what JBPs are capable of surviving in let alone thriving in. The pines don't seem to mind one bit and put out several flushes of growth per year. I'm not needing antifungal treatment either. Just an open mix to prevent root rot and appropriate watering.

It's interesting to compare notes and see what plants are capable of under the artificial circumstnaces we place our bonsai trees in.
 
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jferrier

Mame
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No secret. Just watering 2 to 3 times a day and gets just a few hours of eastern sun.
My atlas's are not in bonsai pots right now as they are too small. I'm relocating so they are in 4" pots until I can get them in the ground to grow out. Not that they have much more soil now than a bonsai pot would though. My deodar cedars relish the sun and heat. I wouldn't know about humidity and cedars as it hasn't rained here in months. Ask me in a few months after I move to Portland! You mentioned artificial conditions. Every year during the hottest part of summer, I bring in two or 3 of my maple varities (Namely Kamagata and Germaines gyration). that suffer badly outside every year. Most leaves turn brown and crispy by August. When they fall of easily I cut off all leaves and bring them inside for a month or so where its cooler and put them in a window. They put out new growth in a few weeks and harden in time for the pathetic TX winter. Now these are only 5 to ten year old trees so a really large old one may be different. I know someone will probably say these trees must be outside, but its worked for me for several years. Its not the ideal situation but 106 degree days aren't either. My mother in law kept the two red maples I gave her inside all summer and hers look better than all of mine that were outside. They are low light trees anyhow, so I think that's why the do ok inside. Got to keep them moist inside as the a/c will dry them out.

That's interesting list you got there.
I would have thought that the cedar species you got would be be well and truly out of typical climate range. The atlas cedar particularly. Atlas cedars are supposedly drought resistant when established but that's for in ground trees. In bonsai pots, the heat you guys are getting in Texas at the moment should have cooked the roots or at least slow roasted them. What's your secret? Tell me do you find humidity to be a problem for your cedars?

I've similar experiences with Shimpakus in a hot climate not being problematic. I've also seen Podocarpus grown in other tropical countries (e.g Vietnam and Singapore) where seem to thrive in pot culture as bonsai and just simply as potted garden trees.

I'm not surprised by your experience of JBPs however. Where I'm situated in Australia, we get a climate with temps reaching in the 90s for 3-4 months of the year with humidity and lots of rain. This is supposed to be against what JBPs are capable of surviving in let alone thriving in. The pines don't seem to mind one bit and put out several flushes of growth per year. I'm not needing antifungal treatment either. Just an open mix to prevent root rot and appropriate watering.

It's interesting to compare notes and see what plants are capable of under the artificial circumstnaces we place our bonsai trees in.
 
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