Non-corrosive tool disinfectant?

Shibui

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,088
Reaction score
9,668
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
Alcohol. I think you guys use the term denatured alcohol where we refer to it as methylated spirits? Rubbing alcohol would do the same. Keep a spray bottle to spray on the cutting tools between plants or a jar of same to dip blades in.
I've heard that milk is a good sanitizer but have no proof of that concept.
 

rockm

Spuds Moyogi
Messages
11,289
Reaction score
15,814
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
What’s a good non corrosive disinfectant to use on carbon steel tools?
You got disinfectant wipes? Use those. or a 10% solution of Clorox. You have to let both set on the blades for a few minutes, wipe with a clean cloth and leave the tools in full sun (UV is also a good disinfectant) for a few hours with blades open to maximize exposure.
 

ceriano

Shohin
Messages
344
Reaction score
119
Location
Richmond, Virginia
USDA Zone
7a
Alcohol. I think you guys use the term denatured alcohol where we refer to it as methylated spirits? Rubbing alcohol would do the same. Keep a spray bottle to spray on the cutting tools between plants or a jar of same to dip blades in.
I've heard that milk is a good sanitizer but have no proof of that concept.
Any issues with corrosion?
 

Ugo

Mame
Messages
144
Reaction score
182
Location
Qc, Canada
USDA Zone
5A
Hi!

After cleaning do you store the tools with a coating of food grade oil?
Any use of lubricant to keep moisture away from the blade that wont endanger the tree?
 

Potawatomi13

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,100
Reaction score
3,534
Location
Eugene, OR
USDA Zone
8
Personally use Tri Flow spray lube. Spray/wipe off twice and put away😊. Not used wet on tools or when put away.
 

Shibui

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,088
Reaction score
9,668
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
Any issues with corrosion?
Alcohol does not corrode steel. Any residue evaporates in less than a minute leaving the surface dry.
Even if used straight away alcohol won't hurt plants.

After cleaning do you store the tools with a coating of food grade oil?
Any use of lubricant to keep moisture away from the blade that wont endanger the tree?
I'm using my tools so often I don't usually bother with oil but when I do I spray with WD40 or similar spray lubricant/penetrant.
Some oils will suffocate if sprayed on the leaves but I don't know any that are toxic when used on tools. I've used cutting tools right after spraying with spray lubricant with no obvious problem. Also used the chainsaw to trunks and roots of many species with no obvious problems after. Chainsaw uses petroleum oils to lubricate so that would end up on the cut surfaces.
 

Ugo

Mame
Messages
144
Reaction score
182
Location
Qc, Canada
USDA Zone
5A
Alcohol does not corrode steel. Any residue evaporates in less than a minute leaving the surface dry.
Even if used straight away alcohol won't hurt plants.


I'm using my tools so often I don't usually bother with oil but when I do I spray with WD40 or similar spray lubricant/penetrant.
Some oils will suffocate if sprayed on the leaves but I don't know any that are toxic when used on tools. I've used cutting tools right after spraying with spray lubricant with no obvious problem. Also used the chainsaw to trunks and roots of many species with no obvious problems after. Chainsaw uses petroleum oils to lubricate so that would end up on the cut surfaces.

Good to know.. me and the wife will stop moving around the sunflower oil from the kitchen to the workshop.
Funny you mention about using chainsaw, as I just used my new one hand battery chainsaw ( and liked it!) and during the work I used food grade lubricant on the chain because I was sure petroleum based oil would do harms...
I used the sunflower oil on the chain before storage... I guess I thought too much..

Thanks Shibu WD40 it will be
 

ceriano

Shohin
Messages
344
Reaction score
119
Location
Richmond, Virginia
USDA Zone
7a
Good to know.. me and the wife will stop moving around the sunflower oil from the kitchen to the workshop.
Funny you mention about using chainsaw, as I just used my new one hand battery chainsaw ( and liked it!) and during the work I used food grade lubricant on the chain because I was sure petroleum based oil would do harms...
I used the sunflower oil on the chain before storage... I guess I thought too much..

Thanks Shibu WD40 it will be
This is the one I use instead of WD-40, it’s lanolin based.

 
  • Like
Reactions: Ugo

hemmy

Chumono
Messages
991
Reaction score
1,263
Location
Ventura Co., CA
USDA Zone
10a
What’s a good non corrosive disinfectant to use on carbon steel tools?

I always used rubbing alcohol (70%) as a wipe down. But further reading across healthcare and nursery/greenhouse trade, led me to believe that tools needed to be soaked or saturated for 10-20min for it to be effective in killing bacteria and viruses.

After reading the below link I switched to spray liquid Lysol after reading about the corrosive nature of bleach (sodium hypochlorite).


BUT, you have to check the Lysol product at each purchase because they are constantly coming out with different products and formulations. The disinfecting chemical I look for is the alkyl dimethylbenzylammonium chloride. (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysol)

Some Clorox brand products also have the same disinfecting chemical in their non-bleach products.

BUT, BUT, notice “ammonium chloride” is also reported to have corrosive effects on certain stainless steel surfaces. So I typically spray the tool and might let it set for a couple minutes (or not) then scrub with an abrasive sponge moistened with Lysol. If it is a tool with moving parts, like shears, I then spray with alcohol to drive any chemical cleaner away from the pivot point and between the blades. Then I wipe everything dry.
 

BrianBay9

Masterpiece
Messages
2,020
Reaction score
3,354
Location
Marina, CA
USDA Zone
10a
I always used rubbing alcohol (70%) as a wipe down. But further reading across healthcare and nursery/greenhouse trade, led me to believe that tools needed to be soaked or saturated for 10-20min for it to be effective in killing bacteria and viruses.

There are very few pathogens that can survive 70% isopropanol sprayed on (or dipped) and let dry, but there are some. If you're sterilizing a surgical suite or drug manufacturing facility, the FDA won't consider isopropanol good enough. But for 99% of your home use it will suffice.
 
Top Bottom