Transplanting Azaleas

Sandcounty

Seedling
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This spring I'm planning on transplanting an azalea from my grandmothers garden. This plant is roughly forty years old and has apricot colored flowers. She claims it to be one of the first varieties hardy to our area.(She has a very good memory) In the last couple of years it hasn't flowered as well, so I offered to get her a new one. My main concern is what soil to use. I've read that Kanuma (sp?) is the preferred choice, but was wondering if this is true for my climate as well. Sand
 

rlist

Shohin
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Portland, OR
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Here in NW Oregon we have found that azalea's planted in 100% Kanuma have a 100% death rate. So, we are now planting in the "West Coast" mix of 1/3 pumice, lava & kanuma. Long term results are still unknown, but we have confidence that it will work well.
 

cbobgo

Mame
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All of my azaleas and rhododendrons are in the same soil mix as the rest of my trees. I do try to hit them with special fertilizers from time to time to keep the pH on the lower side.

They generally are pretty easy to collect and transplant, because their roots form a thick mat of fibrous roots. Usually no long runners or deep tap roots.

Post some pics of the tree when you get it.

- bob
 

Sandcounty

Seedling
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rlist and Bob, Thanks for the replys. The threads I was reading were from about 2-3 years ago. It seems going with straight Kanuma is no longer the norm, which is fine by me.($$$) I looked at the azalea today, but the ground is still frozen solid and it's under two feet of snow. There are about 4-5 trunks an inch+ thick, and it's four feet tall overall. So I should have something to work with. Grandma doesn't like it anymore, because as she says "it's gone to wood". I'll post picks down the road. Thanks, Sand
 

cbobgo

Mame
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If you live in Japan, Kanuma is still the way to go. But their climate is pretty different from what the rest of us have.

- bob
 

Graydon

Chumono
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Greeting from sunny Florida. Azaleas, specifically satsuki varieties in 100% kanuma with the best of luck. I am experimenting with screening a moss or other organic matter over the kanuma as suggested in the Azalea book by Bob Callaham.

If you like satsuki this is a must have book. Too much to comprehend and absorb in the first reading.
 

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