Tree id & collecting tips

G3ON5IA_GUY

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Thinking this may be some type of oak? I've found quite a few nice trees that had been chopped back in the past that I would consider collecting, if it is worth it that is.



Wondering if anyone could help me ID this tree please. Thanks
 
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daveskib

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Not 100 percent sure but looks like some sort of oak....
 

Bob O

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Looks like Live Oak. If it still has green leaves on it now, in January, I would be 99% sure it is Live Oak.

Hope this helps,
 

G3ON5IA_GUY

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Looks like Live Oak. If it still has green leaves on it now, in January, I would be 99% sure it is Live Oak.

Hope this helps,
Thanks for the quick responses, thats what I thought as well but I wasn't 100% sure considering the leaves look different than all the larger ones in the area. I assume these are juvenile leaves that popped out since the tree had been cut back? Couldn't find much on the internet along the lines of juvenile foliage on Quercus virginiana.
 

G3ON5IA_GUY

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I'm a little worried about attempting to collect these though. We basically have this season to collect because by this time next year the land could be sold. I've mostly read that it is difficult to successfully collect these trees all at once because they depend so much on a large tap root. Do ya'll think it would be possible and if so how should we go about it?

Thanks
 

PaulH

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Honestly, that tree just doesn't look worth the effort of digging it and trying to keep it alive unless it is doomed anyway and you just want to practice. You don't always need branches but a good base and taper are a must. You said there are a lot... maybe some others are better.
I'm pretty sure it is a live oak. I've collected lots of live oaks here in California and they are pretty easy to get a high success rate but I don't know if eastern varieties are the same. I dig live oaks in the late winter/ early spring as the weather is just starting to warm up and have found that it is very important to completely defoliate the tree when collecting.
Paul
 

G3ON5IA_GUY

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Thanks for the info. Yes there are many more that have been cut back but I was hoping to get them while I could even if they weren't ideal. Their is a good chance the new future owner could clear everything out anyways. The nebari looks pretty good, I figured if I collected this one I could/would do a lot of carving work to add taper... just an idea.

When you have collected this species do you bare root it or leave as much soil as possible as to not tamper with the remaining roots to much? What are your general steps to insure survival with these trees?

Thanks very much for the info!
 
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jk_lewis

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I was hoping to get them while I could even if they weren't ideal.
It would be a lot of work for something that isn't "quite ideal." And why work on somehing like that? I'd leave them. Something better will come along.
 

G3ON5IA_GUY

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Thanks but it is quite hard to find much better around here. Hard to find anything real interesting in terms of yamadori, most everything is fairly straight with the exception of a select handful. I at least want to dig a few for experience with the species. Plus there are some I feel I can do something with. When the better ones come along, I will gladly take those as well.
 
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rockm

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It is a live oak--Southern Live oaks can produce several different kinds of foliage on the same tree.

If you've not collected before you should know digging that up is going to take quite an effort. A trunk that large will have a solid, extensive, DEEP root system. If you have to get it out this year, right now, I'd cut back the big surface roots about eight inches out from the trunk--dig around the trunk eight inches out and eight inches down find the roots cut them.

Once that's done backfill with loose bonsai soil and leave the tree alone. WAIT until September (pray you dont' get a hard freeze before the end of the winter). You will have to make sure the soil remains moist (not soggy not dry) between now and then.

In September, hopefully the tree will have put out a new set of roots. You might be able to complete the collection then IF there are new roots.

Bring along a heavy iron prybar (5' long or longer with a flat end)...and someone to help you excavate the tree. Don't expect things to go like they do in books. It never happens that way...
 

G3ON5IA_GUY

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I've done a lot of landscape work over the years and realized they wont be easy to dig. I did fear, as you have stated, that this would be hard to do in one season. The surface roots are big and I would imagine not much along the lines of fine feeder roots anywhere near by.... hmmm not looking so good:(
 
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