Type of branch sealant?

TeKmInIbI

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I'm currently using a beewax based paste that i apply when i cut a tree down in size, is this fine?
Or should i be using something different?
 

milehigh_7

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:eek::eek:*Shouts to TeKmInIbI* "Save your self!!!!!" :eek::eek:


LOL!!! Quick! Someone put the lid back on Pandora's box!
:eek:
 

rockm

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Maybe it's because they're old...

but old bonsaiists (Nick Lenz in particular) swears by Preparation H (yeah, the hemorrhoid product) covered with aluminum foil to help heal large pruning wounds. Makes sense since the oils in the product would keep the area moist and seal it off from bacterial infection-although done improperly it can also seal IN bacterial infections.
 

cquinn

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Only use the paste for broken branches! Use the putty for cut wounds. When I first started I used the liquid paste stuff, and it will not come off! I had to manually take it off along with bark.
 

head_cutter

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pruning

Sorry to say this but, most of us have realized over the years and trees, that a properly made cut (at either the right time of year--or--with the right tool--or--in the right way), doesn't need anything but little dirt rubbed in it. If even that.

A healthy tree will compartmentalize on it's own and the healing process will begin right away. I've seen more damage done to a cut when using any form of 'cut-paste' than by doing any of the above things.

(don't know about Prep H tho, still thinking (and chuckling) about that one)

Bob
 

Glider

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That's true. Trees have been healing by themselves for millions of years.

I admit to using the putty type stuff on azaleas though (they have a very thin bark). I think it helps prevent dieback in very thin-barked trees. Azaleas have a tendency to withrdraw sap lines sometimes after a cut and I think keeping the cambium moist untill it begins to callus naturally can help.

The putty type sealant is not too sticky and keeps the cambium moist and provides a bit of cover until the callus begins to form. As soon as that happens (you can tell by the cracks that appear in the putty), I take it off again. On large cuts, I use a ring of the stuff, just to cover the freshly exposed cambium. I suspect covering the whole wound could actually work against the tree, encouraging the heart wood to rot.
 

flor1

Mame
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Korean Hornbeam

I'll try and keep this simple and direct on a Korean Hornbeam is wound sealant necessary to use Having read somewhere that it was. I have a tree that I need to trim and can't seem to locate the proper information. Thanks for any input and information.
 
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Sorry to say this but, most of us have realized over the years and trees, that a properly made cut (at either the right time of year--or--with the right tool--or--in the right way), doesn't need anything but little dirt rubbed in it. If even that.

A healthy tree will compartmentalize on it's own and the healing process will begin right away. I've seen more damage done to a cut when using any form of 'cut-paste' than by doing any of the above things.

(don't know about Prep H tho, still thinking (and chuckling) about that one)

Bob

A man after my own heart... how refreashing. Oh wait... you are in SE Asia... where the kick-@ss trees can often be found. No wonder.

Welcome...

Kindest regards,

Victrinia
 
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I admit to using the putty type stuff on azaleas though (they have a very thin bark). I think it helps prevent dieback in very thin-barked trees. Azaleas have a tendency to withrdraw sap lines sometimes after a cut and I think keeping the cambium moist untill it begins to callus naturally can help.

Interesting... when I wound my satsuki, or azaleas... all it wants to do is sprout new growth right where I went through the trouble to remove it all... :D

Kindest regards,

Victrinia
 

Glider

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That's true as a rule (it's one of the things I love about satsuki), but they also have very discrete vascular bundles compared to other trees and so, occasionally, when removing larger branches, they can withdraw the sap line on that side if there isn't a lot of vigorous growth directly above it.

I found this out to my cost on a subaru. I removed an ugly lower branch, hoping to use one of the expected new shoots to form a new branch, but instead, it withdrew the sap path and refused to put out any new shoots. I'm now having to let the thing go wild for a couple of years to reestablish the sap paths and heal over the old cuts. I found out this year when I repotted it that the that the roots were weaker on that side also, but I couldn't know that when I made the main cut as I hadn't repotted it that year (obviously).
 

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