What was your largest Trident maple cutting?

bonhe

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That is my question!
I have a chance to collect a large trident maple from my teacher's yard. This trident maple used to be in 3 gallon container and it has been untouched by my teacher about 25 years (my teacher said he used to have about 100 trident maple prebonsai in 3 gallon pots and all sold out many years ago, except this one). Its roots escaped the pot and went deep down into the ground. The lower part of the tree grew big and ruptured the pot. It has really nice trunk movement with deadwood along the trunk line and about 1 meter height. The trunk base is about 35 cm! I plan to make a large cutting at the lower part of the trunk in the winter.

My success rates with large cuttings for olive, crepe myrtle, pomegranate are 100%. I never had trident maple, so I have no experience. However, I think the principle will be the same as other species. Thank you.
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bonhe

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Pretty sure he's going to be collecting the tree and wants to know what's the biggest cutting people have rooted, so that he can use the top as a cutting.

Aaron
You got me Aaron! :)
Bonhe
 

jcrossett

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What about an air layer.
Or you could bury the lowest branch to see if it will root then cut the branch off after it roots.

I asked for the picture so everyone can see potential airlayers. To help you out. You could always collect the tree take it home plant it back in the ground and tack cutting every year and sell for tool,wire soil etc.
 

Eric Group

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I have experience tacking them on old wood but it is far from 100% with Tridents! I have found them to be terrible fickle about producing roots even compared other Maples like JM or Amur...

How big is the section you plan to do the cutting from? If it is important to you I definitely recommend a layer, but even those are not as consistently successful for me on Tridents as with other species... They have a tendency to make big ugly knobby callouses with no roots sometimes! Good luck.
 

bonhe

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What about an air layer.
Or you could bury the lowest branch to see if it will root then cut the branch off after it roots.

I asked for the picture so everyone can see potential airlayers. To help you out. You could always collect the tree take it home plant it back in the ground and tack cutting every year and sell for tool,wire soil etc.
Airlayering is out of my mind! :) Thanks for suggestion though.
I could take whole tree with its roots, plant it in the training pot, and carve it out when the time comes.
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bonhe

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I have experience tacking them on old wood but it is far from 100% with Tridents! I have found them to be terrible fickle about producing roots even compared other Maples like JM or Amur...

How big is the section you plan to do the cutting from? If it is important to you I definitely recommend a layer, but even those are not as consistently successful for me on Tridents as with other species... They have a tendency to make big ugly knobby callouses with no roots sometimes! Good luck.
Thanks for your sharing.
The diameter of the cutting will be about 35 cm. Like I said, I will not do airlayering on this tree.
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Eric Group

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Airlayering is out of my mind! :) Thanks for suggestion though.
I could take whole tree with its roots, plant it in the training pot, and carve it out when the time comes.
Bonhe
I must be confused- If... You can take the whole tree with it's roots, why can't you air layer it after that? If the part you are trying to save is important, do that. If it is not.... Then just do what you are going to do anyway....

In my experience really large cuttings, especially of Trident, are rarely successful. I get maybe 30-40% success with large ones off JM, I have yet to have anything over about .5 inches root as cuttings from Tridents.
 

bonhe

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I must be confused- If... You can take the whole tree with it's roots, why can't you air layer it after that? If the part you are trying to save is important, do that. If it is not.... Then just do what you are going to do anyway....

In my experience really large cuttings, especially of Trident, are rarely successful. I get maybe 30-40% success with large ones off JM, I have yet to have anything over about .5 inches root as cuttings from Tridents.
I am sorry for your confusion!
I should have explained it more. I am too lazy to dig the whole tree with the root, so I want to do the cutting.
The lower part I can either keep or discard. If the cutting is not guaranteed 100 %, I will go into other way. When I keep the whole tree, I will perform carving from the trunk base all the way up the apex and I believe it will be looked nice, too. I have win- win situation! :) Thanks for your input.
Bonhe
 

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Sir Harry Tomlinson wrote in his book: " Tridents can be propagated by hard wood cuttings of the various thickness, from pencil up to wrist size... taken from the end of winter to early spring and stuck into the sharp sand". But I really haven't tried, just theory.
 

augustine

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Take a dozen small cuttings now, a large percentage should root esp in California.

I took some cuttings a few weeks ago, hardwood cuttings (this year's wood that hardened off). 7 out of 12 have taken. I cut them from the tree, made "v" cuts with a razor blades, used rooting powder and kept them under the deck where it's damp. (Of course kept them watered but also sprayed water on the ground so that there would be extra humidity. I plan on starting to introduce them to more light little by little. In my area the roots will continue to grow 'til November and will be careful to overwinter them buried in mulch in a protected spot. Should work better where you live.

At least you'll have some and they grow quickly. I've read about people striking large cuttings but haven't done it myself. Maybe you can experiment next year with larger cuttings early in the season?
 

bonhe

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It was dug out on 12/17/2016. After I cut few really big roots, it has no more feeding roots left!
It comes along very well. I passed by and looked at it every day. I am so excited when I found vegetative buds swelling up through out the remained branches.

I like this one because it has a lot of natural dead wood. It will be very fun project for me in the future.

1.png 2.png 3.png 4.png
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bonhe

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It was carved last winter. I am planning to continue carving it this winter if I find the time .
It is at present.
27BE0B76-1BDB-44CB-A646-84916247A479.jpeg
Thụ Thoại
 

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