Wind - Impact on Trunk

Daniel_UK

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I have noticed that there is a huge difference between the stalks of fuchsia that grow in windy locations and in non-windy locations. The fuchsia that have spent the last 2 weeks outside on my high-up windy balcony (image on the right) have hardened up, turned brown, and is spending more of its energy on the stalk rather than its height. The fuchsia indoors (image on the left) have grown higher but the stalks are completely green and softer. I should mention that I have grown around 20 fuchsia and half are in the windy conditions and half aren't, and they show this pattern. Also, that they were both sprouted at the same time indoors and that the temperature is fairly similar indoors and on our sunny balcony at the moment. The indoor fuschias are also in a sunny south-facing windowsill.

One of the main goals in bonsai is to thicken the trunk to help with compactness, making the tree seem bigger and/or older than it really is. With that in mind, do you think very windy conditions, such as exposed mountainous areas, can thicken the trunk? If this is the case, could it be beneficial to find the windiest bit of the garden to place your bonsai or to use powerful fans for young indoor bonsais?


20200523_161543.jpg 20200523_162252.jpg
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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The continuous tearing of the tissue due to the wind causes it to produce more woody tissue. Almost like broken bones healing.

But once the woody tissue is there, the micro tearing stops and the effects are minimal.

The downside is that scarred tissue is less likely to bud and tends to snap faster when being bent. It can also start bulging causing reverse taper.

So it's a double edged blade in some way.
 

Matt B

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Have you considered the light issue? Trees grown under less light etoliate in search of more light, like a seedling trying to reach the forest canopy. Trees in full sun or higher light conditions concentrate on branching and horizontal growth, and the trunk to support the weight of the additional branches and foliage. The wind may be comparatively irrelevant in that equation.
 

Daniel_UK

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The continuous tearing of the tissue due to the wind causes it to produce more woody tissue. Almost like broken bones healing.

But once the woody tissue is there, the micro tearing stops and the effects are minimal.

The downside is that scarred tissue is less likely to bud and tends to snap faster when being bent. It can also start bulging causing reverse taper.

So it's a double edged blade in some way.

Thanks for your response - it seems that for an established woody trunk, wind will have little effect. I have found at article on the impact of wind on plant growth but I think it may take me a couple of months to get through it: https://www.researchgate.net/public..._impacts_on_plant_growth_mechanics_and_damage
 

Daniel_UK

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Have you considered the light issue? Trees grown under less light etoliate in search of more light, like a seedling trying to reach the forest canopy. Trees in full sun or higher light conditions concentrate on branching and horizontal growth, and the trunk to support the weight of the additional branches and foliage. The wind may be comparatively irrelevant in that equation.

I take your point about light differences. They are essentially on the other side of the glass from each other and get the same amount of light but I suppose the light intensity through the glass is less than outside.
 

just.wing.it

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The continuous tearing of the tissue due to the wind causes it to produce more woody tissue. Almost like broken bones healing.

But once the woody tissue is there, the micro tearing stops and the effects are minimal.

The downside is that scarred tissue is less likely to bud and tends to snap faster when being bent. It can also start bulging causing reverse taper.

So it's a double edged blade in some way.
Careful.....you may bring out the "hammer your bonsai trunk to gain girth fast" crowd.
....I'm pretty sure someone here did that before.....cant recall exactly.
 

sorce

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It for bark not girth.


Sorce
 

Forsoothe!

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I take your point about light differences. They are essentially on the other side of the glass from each other and get the same amount of light but I suppose the light intensity through the glass is less than outside.
Yes, UV gets filtered out by glass, but not plastic windows, only IFR pass through glass.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Yes, it is pretty well documented that wind can shape trees, at the lesser end of the spectrum, flexing of the trunk causes some thickening of the trunk with increased rigidity. At the extreme, you get windswept styles and krumholz in alpine regions.
 

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