Acer Palmatum Dissectum Layer?

digger714

Shohin
Messages
367
Reaction score
2
Location
Mooresville, NC - USA
USDA Zone
7B
Hello to all. I have a layer going on an acer palmatum dissectum, and the leaves on the layer are starting to turn a little brown on the tips, more than the rest of the tree. I water the layer good, and am just wondering if its telling me to take it off, or maybe add more soil to maintain the roots? Its had roots on it for 3 months or more now. Any ideas?
 

digger714

Shohin
Messages
367
Reaction score
2
Location
Mooresville, NC - USA
USDA Zone
7B
Yes, for the most part, it gets about 1 hour of direct sunlight a day. Its on the east side of my house, and have trees less than 25 feet away toward the east, so it only gets sun from around 11/1130 am until 12:30/1. Its 11 pm here now, and i just went out, and you can tell they have a little different tint of green/red than the rest of the tree. Would any pictures help?
 
Last edited:

SouthernMaple

Shohin
Messages
434
Reaction score
440
Location
Brevard NC
USDA Zone
7a
Yes, for the most part, it gets about 1 hour of direct sunlight a day. Its on the east side of my house, and have trees less than 25 feet away toward the east, so it only gets sun from around 11/1130 am until 12:30/1. Its 11 pm here now, and i just went out, and you can tell they have a little different tint of green/red than the rest of the tree. Would any pictures help?
did it work?
 

leatherback

The Treedeemer
Messages
10,390
Reaction score
17,312
Location
Northern Germany
USDA Zone
7
If it has rooted 3 months ago, why did you not separate?

I could imagine the tree is giving up on the layer now, reducing water provision?
 

Shibui

Masterpiece
Messages
3,697
Reaction score
6,895
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
Dissectum are notorious for not having strong enough roots to support the plant. That's why they are usually grafted.
 

SouthernMaple

Shohin
Messages
434
Reaction score
440
Location
Brevard NC
USDA Zone
7a
Dissectum are notorious for not having strong enough roots to support the plant. That's why they are usually grafted.
what about seedlings or cuttings? I am only looking to bonsai purebloods
 

Shibui

Masterpiece
Messages
3,697
Reaction score
6,895
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
Most seedlings of the weeping varieties die after 1-3 years. I have only had one that lasted longer. It got to around 20 years but just died last winter.
I only know of 2 people who have weeping maple seedlings last. Not sure what the secret might be.
If you are trying seedlings fro weeping vars put in lots to allow for attrition. Eventually you should come up with a couple of seedlings that can grow OK.

Cuttings are similar. The genes that make the trees weep must also cause weaker roots.

If you are looking for a deeply dissected leaf but with stronger roots try to find 'Seryu' It is the only upright growing dissected leaf JM an should grow OK without grafting. Mine do not grow true from seed though. Only 1 in 100 have the deeply dissected lacy leaves like the parent.
 

0soyoung

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
7,000
Reaction score
11,600
Location
Anacortes, WA (AHS heat zone 1)
USDA Zone
8b
Most seedlings of the weeping varieties die after 1-3 years. I have only had one that lasted longer. It got to around 20 years but just died last winter.
I only know of 2 people who have weeping maple seedlings last. Not sure what the secret might be.
If you are trying seedlings fro weeping vars put in lots to allow for attrition. Eventually you should come up with a couple of seedlings that can grow OK.

Cuttings are similar. The genes that make the trees weep must also cause weaker roots.

If you are looking for a deeply dissected leaf but with stronger roots try to find 'Seryu' It is the only upright growing dissected leaf JM an should grow OK without grafting. Mine do not grow true from seed though. Only 1 in 100 have the deeply dissected lacy leaves like the parent.
I wonder how much of this is due to trying to orient the layered stem (more or less) vertically instead of keeping it (more or less) horizontal and making a cascade bonsai with it. Any thoughts?

I had a years long just such a problem with layers of my shin deshojo layers.
 

Shibui

Masterpiece
Messages
3,697
Reaction score
6,895
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
I wonder how much of this is due to trying to orient the layered stem (more or less) vertically instead of keeping it (more or less) horizontal and making a cascade bonsai with it. Any thoughts?
Most of my seedlings never got as far as starting to weep. About half die in the first summer. The rest typically do not leaf out the following spring or die soon after getting leaves in spring.
If any of the seedlings from seeds from weeping AP look interesting I have taken to grafting them during the first summer. That's the only sure way I have found to keep them alive.

A friend has a bonsai group of AP dissectum all grown from seed sown directly in the tray and allowed to grow in place. Now around 12 years old and all styled as upright trees. They have only been root pruned as a group, never transplanted individually. Perhaps that's the secret? I do not know the attrition rate he had over the first few years.
Survival may just be a genetic lottery, depending on the parent and the individual genetic combination of each seedling.
Whatever the reason start with many more than you want and be prepared for losses.
 

rodeolthr

Mame
Messages
209
Reaction score
173
Location
Seattle, WA
USDA Zone
8a
For whatever reason, I have had quite good luck with weeping (dissectum) seedlings. I have about 20 that are now 5-7 years old from one of the first batches of seeds that I germinated. I do seed them every year and treat them the same as all my other seedlings. I find that I don't actually get a lot of dissectum seedlings from the seed collected from the mother plant. They are much slower growing initially, so some will get out-paced/shaded-out in the seedling flats. I also find that they have a very fibrous root system, seemingly more so than others. The one shown in the picture is about 8 years old. It has always been grown in a container. Most other varieties of that age would easily have twice the diameter, grown under the same conditions.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_4601.jpg
    IMG_4601.jpg
    375.6 KB · Views: 13

Similar threads

Top Bottom