Black pine clump?

Bonsai Nut

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An amazing example of a clump style JBP. I have never seen one of these in person, and I'm sure it's due in part to the difficulty of maintaining black pine in this style. It would be very difficult to maintain energy balance and prevent inner buds from dying, to say nothing of the manual dexterity required to wire inner branches. The bark on the trunks is really expressive. I'd love to see this in real life!





 

emorrin

Sapling
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Thanks for sharing. I didn't think this was possible with Japanese Black Pines. Can this be several single JBP's all grown together then the roots being fused as one through several years of growth?
 

Bonsai Nut

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Thanks for sharing. I didn't think this was possible with Japanese Black Pines. Can this be several single JBP's all grown together then the roots being fused as one through several years of growth?

This is how I assume it was developed. The bark suggests these are pretty old trees for as small as they are. I imagine they were developed separately and then planted together. It was quite and undertaking, and I'll bet this tree is extremely difficult to maintain.
 
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Interesting clump. The needles are far out of porportion, but other than that, it is eye catching.



Will
 

Mojosan

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This may be a very technically difficult style, but I can't say that it is an attractive composition.
The needles are too long, the foliage too clumped, and there is no definitive line - the trunks are much to crouded together.

To me it looks like a young nursery mugo gone wild. Not my cup o'tea.
 

bonsaiTOM

Mame
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Wanted to bring this old thread back to life. Any additional info/updates to offer? Anyone know who owns this clump? or where/when the photo was taken?

All comments aside I am interested in the concept, style and execution. Would love to see other clumps, groups and forests discussed here.
 

edprocoat

Masterpiece
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I think thats a beautiful grouping. The first picture which I assume is the front is stunning, it looks as if a forest was put in a pot. Very much like many stands of pines I see here throughout Florida in the winter. I wonder if the inside needles or much wiring is really needed in this composition? I would think its been mainly clippped and grown that way.

ed
 

tanlu

Shohin
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The composition is nice, but IMO there is much need for refinement. The growth looks too course and the needles are way out of proportion. I'm not very experienced with JBP, but perhaps sticking to strictly organic fert for delicate branch develpment and removing candles later in the season would help?

T
 

imholte

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IMO I dont think the needles are really that long or out of proportion. Compare it to a ponderosa and these needles are really small. It looks like it could use alot of wiring and that would really make this tree or trees stand out nicely. It would be a buggar to wire though, can you imagine trying to wire those inner branches. Hopefully whoever owns this tree knows what they are doing otherwise you will lose alot of inner branches. Would be great to see it fully wired.
 

Vance Wood

Lord Mugo
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IMO I dont think the needles are really that long or out of proportion. Compare it to a ponderosa and these needles are really small. It looks like it could use alot of wiring and that would really make this tree or trees stand out nicely. It would be a buggar to wire though, can you imagine trying to wire those inner branches. Hopefully whoever owns this tree knows what they are doing otherwise you will lose alot of inner branches. Would be great to see it fully wired.

If you ever get hold of one of the old Yoshimura books you will notice that there used to be a practice of planting an entire JBP cone and let the emerging seedlings do what they want. What you see here is kind of what you get from that kind of planting.
 

Joedes3

Shohin
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Vance,
Just looking at this post. How would you plant the cone? Would this work for all pine cones?
Thanks
Joe
 

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