Can I use this type of moss for bonsai?

bonsainewbeeee

Seedling
Messages
11
Reaction score
2
Not sure what type of moss to use for bonsai for decoration

Can I use this one?

Thanks in advance
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20200812_114938.jpg
    IMG_20200812_114938.jpg
    196.4 KB · Views: 74

MrWunderful

Chumono
Messages
895
Reaction score
1,025
Location
SF Bay area
USDA Zone
10b
You can, but I probably would not. It looks pretty vigorous. Pick something that grows natural in your area.

You want something to hold the top layer stable, not compete with the tree.
 

Bnana

Mame
Messages
197
Reaction score
201
Location
The Netherlands
USDA Zone
8
It's not moss, it's a vascular plant related to carnation. It has roots unlike moss so not suitable.
 

Forsoothe!

Masterpiece
Messages
4,004
Reaction score
4,727
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
6b
I second the condemnation. Scotch moss and Irish moss fall into the same category of not being moss or good for bonsai.
 

Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
Messages
11,732
Reaction score
31,649
Location
B’ham, AL
USDA Zone
8A
No, this is bad bad bad stuff. It will get everywhere and absolutely take over. It is aggressive and has a root system which, ironically keeps the bonsai soil very wet. That and oxalis are my sworn garden enemies.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
8,391
Reaction score
15,594
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
That is what we call Irish Moss or Scotts Moss - Sagina subulata or related species - as said not a true moss, a very invasive weed. So invasive, it is sold for use as a lawn substitute where there is foot traffic, you can not "stamp it out". Don't let it near your bonsai pots, you won't be able to get rid of it.

My favorite true moss, is "crack in the sidewalk moss". I have no clue the species, but this is the one you should look for. Common growing in the cracks of concrete in urban and suburban areas. Might also be found in cemeteries, in rural areas without sidewalks. Also moss can be found just about anywhere moist. Pretty much any true moss can be used for bonsai. Collect a few different species the mix of textures will look nice.
 

BonsaiDTLA

Yamadori
Messages
60
Reaction score
65
Location
Pacific Southwest
USDA Zone
10
For bonsai, you want the tight, cushion mosses.

Mnium hornum, or Bryum argenteum are what you want. The common sidewalk moss that I (and most others) collect is typically Bryum argenteum.
 

HorseloverFat

Masterpiece
Messages
2,375
Reaction score
3,109
Location
Northeast Wisconsin
USDA Zone
5a
Do you have anywhere you can “hunt”.... I LOVE “moss hunting days”..

You can collect small specimens of various mosses and build a leveled “moss-farm” of sorts..IF you are weird like me and/or are planning on utilizing moss for alternating reasons.

🤓
 

DonovanC

Shohin
Messages
406
Reaction score
415
Location
Ohio, U.S.
USDA Zone
6a
“Sidewalk moss”
What’s commonly called cushion moss is the best for bonsai, its easily found in cracks of sidewalks.
I believe it’s Leucobryum glaucum.
It stays on the surface as any true moss, but this particular moss thrives in pots and it’s really dense.
 

HorseloverFat

Masterpiece
Messages
2,375
Reaction score
3,109
Location
Northeast Wisconsin
USDA Zone
5a
“Sidewalk moss”
What’s commonly called cushion moss is the best for bonsai, its easily found in cracks of sidewalks.
I believe it’s Leucobryum glaucum.
It stays on the surface as any true moss, but this particular moss thrives in pots and it’s really dense.

If you know of parks with large stone staircases... Those areas (As long as shaded) are goldmines for cushion mosses...

If in a more urban setting, check alleyway maintenance inlets... y’know, the “alleys WITHIN alleys”
 

Similar threads

Top