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Woocash

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I took a second look, one of the heavy branches turns out to be shadow, your branches are not as heavy as I thought. However, I usually plan my trees out in thirds. My eye was treating what you collected as the first third of the finished tree. So at 24 inches, I could see this finished at nearly 6 feet. Fist third is trunk, second third is main branches, final third is only secondary and tertiary branches and leaves. I would bring the central trunk down a bit if you want to keep it under 4 feet tall.

But the above is my taste, it doesn't have to be yours.
I was umming and ahhing about whether to take it down a bit more, in all honesty for that reason, but as per usual, the photos dont do it justice. The proportions do look right and the taper is so much more obvious in person. I was hoping for closer to a 3 or 4 foot tree in the end though so maybe I just misunderstood your first post! There is a bud just above where that shadow lies though so maybe that’s a good point to take it down to. It’s a shame the shadow isn’t a branch though because that would give it the movement that section needs! I’ll go outside and stare at a stick in a pot some more I think.
 

Woocash

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I keep hearing this "full moon" thing. What's the science here?
That’s what I wondered. There isn’t much so I’m just taking the ‘no harm done’ route for now and seeing how it works out. What @ConorDash posted pretty much says all I’ve been able to find out about the scientific basis, which makes sense in terms of the most basic physical forces. Gravity works on all things and if stationary, non sentient life forms draw water around their structures then why not use the assistance of fluctuations in gravity to focus strength on their different systems?

For now, I’m just going with the principle, but in the future I’d like to start being a little more scientific about it. With experiments of cuttings, sowing of seeds, pruning, repotting etc. Probably inside, under more controlled environmental conditions and not with trees, per say, but veg under grow lights.
 

NotSorce

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You know how I hate to be picky, but the distance from the earth to the moon has no correlation to the phases of the moon. Futhermore, the full moon obits the earth for about one day and spends the same amount of time on the far side of earth, or any given longitude, as long as it does any any other side. No difference!
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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I don't follow the "moon thing", but lunar cycles are biologically significant, if you doubt me, ask your wife.

There is a positive correlation between the full moon and certain weather, but I'm fuzzy on details, I think more frequent rain around full moon, but I don't know.

Honestly, I don't know the plant effects of the lunar cycles, but it is clear plants "know" what time of year it is.

I do my bonsai work when I get time. I never wait for the moon. But I do try to be in the right season.
 

NotSorce

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There are 12 3/8 lunar cycles per year. It takes 27.3 days to complete one orbit of earth. That means the moon is in a different position on any given calendar day from year-to-year. And in a different position at the same clock time from day-to-day. Mankind has been barking at the moon for thousands of years, and if there was any real correlation to anything, we'd know. We would have charts. We have tide charts because that works. The Farmer's Almanac is not a chart. There is no correlation between the moon and growing anything except the hair on Wolfman. Come to think of it... Source has a heavy beard.
 

Woocash

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You know how I hate to be picky, but the distance from the earth to the moon has no correlation to the phases of the moon. Futhermore, the full moon obits the earth for about one day and spends the same amount of time on the far side of earth, or any given longitude, as long as it does any any other side. No difference!
There are 12 3/8 lunar cycles per year. It takes 27.3 days to complete one orbit of earth. That means the moon is in a different position on any given calendar day from year-to-year. And in a different position at the same clock time from day-to-day. Mankind has been barking at the moon for thousands of years, and if there was any real correlation to anything, we'd know. We would have charts. We have tide charts because that works. The Farmer's Almanac is not a chart. There is no correlation between the moon and growing anything except the hair on Wolfman. Come to think of it... Source has a heavy beard.
But it is to do with the alignment of the sun and the moon in relation to the earth, which does affect the force of gravity on earth and that is what the theory is based around, as far as I can tell. It may be a load of mumbo jumbo, but people have been using the moon for thousand of years to govern agricultural practices so who knows? Some old wive’s tales are nonsense, some have credence. I’m not going to follow it religiously, if buds are bursting I’m not not going to miss a repot etc, but if you don’t try, you dont know.
 

ConorDash

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Look.. just google it. Not to say trust everything online but it can’t be complete crap if so much has been said and people on this forum follow it.. each to their own :)
 

rockm

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But it is to do with the alignment of the sun and the moon in relation to the earth, which does affect the force of gravity on earth and that is what the theory is based around, as far as I can tell. It may be a load of mumbo jumbo, but people have been using the moon for thousand of years to govern agricultural practices so who knows? Some old wive’s tales are nonsense, some have credence. I’m not going to follow it religiously, if buds are bursting I’m not not going to miss a repot etc, but if you don’t try, you dont know.
People have believed the sun orbited the earth for longer than they have believed the converse...they also thought sacrificing other human beings would appease the sun...just sayin. ;-)
 

Woocash

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Look.. just google it. Not to say trust everything online but it can’t be complete crap if so much has been said and people on this forum follow it.. each to their own :)
Have you noticed any affects mate?
 

Woocash

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People have believed the sun orbited the earth for longer than they have believed the converse...they also thought sacrificing other human beings would appease the sun...just sayin. ;-)
And how do you know it doesn’t? I’m willing to try if you are...
 

Woocash

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Ok, last of the January collections (I think). I collected them a few days ago, but have only just got round to photographing them.

First up, a little box, Buxus Sempervirens, collected from my sister’s allotment. She has only recently taken over the allotment and there’s a box hedge with a few stragglers on the end. The rest of the bush was dead but new life has appeared around the base. Measures 5” wide, 6” tall. 1:grit, 1:bark, 1:compost (that’s all I had left)
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Woocash

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Next, a Japanese Barberry, Berberis Thunbergii. Taken from a group of landscape shrubs, this one is approximately 30 years old and was being smothered out by the larger shrubs nearby. 3”wide and 6”tall. Beautiful autumn colours.
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Woocash

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Here is a little hawthorn clump, Crataegus Monogyna, that people have been kindly employing the hedging technique on for the last few years. It may be one of the very few I have collected that will be ready for a first styling after (if) it has recovered. 5” base, 17” high, 20” wide. Standard compost mixes as above.
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Woocash

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Lastly another hawthorn, as above from only a few metres away, but out of the way of machinery. This is probably my favourite collection so far and although I forgot to take photos of the roots, has a nice shape as it continues downwards. I like the opposite arcs and I want to carve the large trunk to give an impression of a broken old tree with a new leader having taken over. 4” base, 20” high to the twigs at the top. Usual mix.
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Leo in N E Illinois

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Nice finds, I especially like the fat Berberis, and the first Crataegus. The first hawthorn is ready to go as soon as you have had a season of healthy growth. Maybe 2021 or 2022 if it is slow getting established.

The really massive 2nd Crataegus, is going to take a long time to work out taper. Or, you will have to develop some serious carving skills.
 

Woocash

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Heh, cheers. I’ve been looking for a suitable piece with a believable story that I can get carving. I used to make double basses and carve their scrolls in a previous life so this will scratch an itch hopefully.

I’m hopeful the first hawthorn does well too. All being well and good, I may actually get an excuse to put one in a proper pot before I’m an old man.
 

NotSorce

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But it is to do with the alignment of the sun and the moon in relation to the earth, which does affect the force of gravity on earth
When the earth is in-between the sun and the moon there is a full moon, or rarely an eclipse, and whatever forces that are exerted by this alignment are distributed over ~24 hours thusly: momentarily peaking in one direction, gradually diminishing for ~12 hours, to peak momentarily in almost the opposite direction. To the same extent that the earth is affected by the moon at any one place on earth it will be oppositely affected ~12 hours later. The reason why every place on earth that has a tide has a continuing need for an updated, current tide table every day is that the effects of the moon on earth is continuously changing. When the moon is in-between the sun and the earth the same distribution of forces exist. Either way, the forces at every meridian are different from pole to pole, and also different along every latitude from 0° to 360°. Forces not equal, but opposite and ever changing. That's what makes it difficult to argue one way or the other. For sure, any wisdom handed down from centuries ago about the effects of the moon on plants comes from the same great sages that believed in alchemy and astrology.
 

Potawatomi13

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You know how I hate to be picky, but the distance from the earth to the moon has no correlation to the phases of the moon. Futhermore, the full moon obits the earth for about one day and spends the same amount of time on the far side of earth, or any given longitude, as long as it does any any other side. No difference!
Actually Earth rotates under the moon each day instead of the other way around. Otherwise you are correct and the phase of the moon etc is complete baloney:rolleyes:.
 

Potawatomi13

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When the moon is in-between the sun and the earth the same distribution of forces exist.
Not true. With both on Earths same side there are extra high tides and the opposite on Earths other side;). True when not aligned these forces vary day to day.

For sure, any wisdom handed down from centuries ago about the effects of the moon on plants comes from the same great sages that believed in alchemy and astrology.
Hear, Hear!😂🤣
 

Forsoothe!

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Not true. With both on Earths same side there are extra high tides and the opposite on Earths other side;). True when not aligned these forces vary day to day.



Hear, Hear!😂🤣
Saying the same thing differently? I meant the forces are equal upon each side as earth rotates and all sides have high tides and low tides. Thank you for the clarification. Are you sure about the baloney? I've always thought of it as cheesey.:p
 

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