Cork oak

Mike Page

Mame
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This quercus suber started out life as a seedling growing in the yard of a member of my club. About the time (20-25 years ago) it reached 10 skinny feet tall, she decided it had to go and offered it to me if I wanted to dig it up. So dig I did. I cut it down to about it's present height before digging.
Before anyone comments on the pot, it's only for training purposes until I find a pot of similiar size and shape that is suitable. It's been in this pot for about a year and a half, so I want to have the next pot by early spring 2011.
Today I did a major trim and gave it a good feeding.
Height including pot is 4 feet.
 

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Mike Page

Mame
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Have you found a pot that is available to suit?
I haven't looked seriously. I'll be at the GSBF convention in October. May find one there. An option might be to have Sara Rayner make one to order. She always does a great job.
 

Bob O

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Tidewater, VA
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Cool tree mike!
I wish we could find cork oak in this area, they look like a good oak to use for bonsai. I am working on two local varities. A Live Oak & a Red Oak. The growth on both is very coarse so only time will tell if I can make them into decent bonsai.

Bob O
 

rockm

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Cork oak is not winter hardy in Va. Live oak makes EXCELLENT bonsai, as does willow oak (quercus phellos). The trick is not to start with saplings of either. Start with larger stock, or larger collected trees.

I'm not partial to the style of this oak, though. It's a bit distracting to me. Too tall
 
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