Double trunk - how high could I layer?

dbonsaiw

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but a twin trunk with both trunks of the same size isn't the best.
At the risk of sounding like my younger son, "but why?". I definitely like the look of a double trunk with one trunk being more dominant, but is that a rule of bonsai aesthetics (like, stay away from inverse taper)?

I have been searching for pics of twin trunks with two similarly sized trunks and this is what I found. (The last pic is a split trunk, but I think it conveys the point as well).

I will leave this tree as the last layer, as I appear to be pretty indecisive.
 

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BrianBay9

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At the risk of sounding like my younger son, "but why?". I definitely like the look of a double trunk with one trunk being more dominant, but is that a rule of bonsai aesthetics (like, stay away from inverse taper)?

I have been searching for pics of twin trunks with two similarly sized trunks and this is what I found. (The last pic is a split trunk, but I think it conveys the point as well).

I will leave this tree as the last layer, as I appear to be pretty indecisive.

Hey, it's your tree not mine. If you like it, then it works.
 

dbonsaiw

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Hey, it's your tree not mine. If you like it, then it works.
I guess I introduced a new question into the thread. The first was what to do with this tree. As usual, I got great opinions that were on opposite spectrums. And since, I have been considering the attached possibility. At least for the next hour, that will be the preference. In short, the jury is still out.

The second question is more general and relates to what we can call "rules" of double trunks. What Shibui said about getting double trunks to look good resonated with me. I thought about the windswept style and the difficulties in pulling this style off. Because there are "rules" for this style. For example, I understand you just can't have the branches swept left and the trunk sweeping right. When I search for twin trunk bonsais, there is no question that the trees drawing me in are ones in which one trunk is clearly dominant. They follow the guidelines Shibui introduced regarding harmony in the trunks etc. Mr. Lane doesn't seem to be in disagreement, but suggested maybe my tree could get there. He also pushed it further and provided examples of great trees that do not follow these guidelines to the T.

In the end, I think I can find better material for a double trunk than this one and will likely end up with one version of the single trunk. But my question still stands - assuming trunks that are more harmonious, is a single dominant trunk required for a good twin trunk? I'm still not so sure it is (but always willing to discuss).
 

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BobbyLane

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If you dont mind layering its very easy to find decent twin material in most nurseries or garden centers. Thats just how trees grow, one trunk usually splits into two. and you can often find multiple trunks in the top of raw stock..
I lost count with how many decent twins I could make out of these.
When I wasnt into air layering id often overlook the tops of trees and just chop low right away, my tastes have change a bit.
 

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