Elm leaf I.D.

M.B.

Mame
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Outside Sacramento, CA
USDA Zone
9
Hi all, I bought an elm last winter that had a tag of Seiju Elm. Once it leafed out I realized it was not. Although I was disappointed I figured it was a regular Chinese Elm, but I don't think it's a regular Chinese Elm either. The first pic. shows the leaf is longer and more serated than the leaf in pic. 2 which I'm pretty sure is a true Chinese Elm. I have several so unless those tags were wrong I'm sure the second pic. is in fact a Chinese Elm. I don't know what kind of Elm it might be. Any guesses?
Mary B.
 

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M.B.

I would guess it is a yatsabusa chinese elm.

Regards,
Martin
 
Thank you, gentlemen. Are there any distictive qualities about this type of elm (good or bad) or are they just a Chinese Elm with a slightly different leaf?
Mary B.
 
Thank you, gentlemen. Are there any distictive qualities about this type of elm (good or bad) or are they just a Chinese Elm with a slightly different leaf?
Mary B.

Both varieties (Ulmus parviflora "Seiju" and Ulmus parviflora "Yatsubusa") originated at the same bonsai nursery (Seiju-En Bonsai Nursery in Lodi, CA). Seiju was a sport off Hokkaido, though I don't know the origin of Yatsubusa. I have found a few references that all refer to the "narrow distinctively toothed leaves". It is a slow-grower, with corky bark that is slow in developing. As a young plant it probably resembles a standard Chinese Elm, though as an older plant with corky bark, I assume it would look more like a Seiju. "Yatsubusa", btw, just means "dwarf".
 
My Yatsubusa does much better than the Seiju, in the same conditions. There is no die-back, it is vigorous and healthy. I think its hardier.
It grows much slower, though, than the original Chinese elm.
 
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