Fertilizing cut air layered maples.

Nor Cal AC

Mame
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I have two Japanese maples that I air layered and separated in June. Would it be a good idea to fertilize them now in early fall to boost root growth before winter sets in, in December? Their roots are growing vigorous on their own in their new larger pots. Lastly, should I do a repot nearing the end of winter with these new air layers?
 

0soyoung

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Sure.
Cannot think of any reason to not have fertilized before now - in moderation of course. Too much fert just sucks the water out of the tree just like salting does a corpse/carcas.
Sure.
Repot in late-winter/spring 'as buds swell'. Trim off the layer stub, gently comb out the roots and screw to a board or pot into a shallow pot/box to get on with nebari development.
 

Nor Cal AC

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Sure.
Cannot think of any reason to not have fertilized before now - in moderation of course. Too much fert just sucks the water out of the tree just like salting does a corpse/carcas.
Sure.
Repot in late-winter/spring 'as buds swell'. Trim off the layer stub, gently comb out the roots and screw to a board or pot into a shallow pot/box to get on with nebari development.
Is a 20-9-9 bonsai fertilizer okay
 

0soyoung

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Not a problem. Apply at the rate of one half teaspoon per gallon of substrate/soil. That will be plenty.
 

Nor Cal AC

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Congratulations!

A successful air layer was pretty much the beginning of my adventure, as well.
One more question Almighty imperial masterpiece. LOL. I also started eight maple cuttings 4 months ago. They are still green and alive but have not produced any new leaves or buds over this northern California summer. Should I lightly fertilize them before winter as well?
 

0soyoung

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I wouldn't until the cuttings pop new leaves, which (btw) is the best way to know they have rooted. Once rooted, fert makes sense = likely next spring if the rooting gods are smiling on you.
 

Nor Cal AC

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I've been too scared to check for roots. I only assumed since they've been alive and green this long that they are rooting successfully but I just don't know.
 

leatherback

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I've been too scared to check for roots. I only assumed since they've been alive and green this long that they are rooting successfully but I just don't know.
Do not check for roots. As said before. New growth is an indicator of root.

Turning black or brown is an indication of failure.

EVerything else amounts to schrodingers cuttings. They at the same time have and have not rooted. (Pulling them out causes the same conflict. Yes they rooted. Nope, there are no more roots on it)
 

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