here's the SCOOP

Boondock

Shohin
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Call'm scoop pots, crescent pots, egg pots. (Does anybody know if there is a Japanese term for these pots?) Here's one I just got out of the kiln today. I make my bottoms different than most potters, I build a small platform, and then build a pot around it. The wiring holes are fore and aft to balance the tree better, if its a heavy cascade. I also like to texture the pot. This pot has a light manganese dioxide wash. (oh, and it's also the first pot I used my impressed stamp. The initials are DB, which stands for Dave Boondock)



 

pjkatich

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Nice pot Dave.

I like the texture and I like the finish. I think they go well together.

Oh, by the way, that's rather handsome looking chop.

Regards,
Paul
 

Graydon

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(oh, and it's also the first pot I used my impressed stamp. The initials are DB, which stands for Dave Boondock)
Likely story. If you invert the pot it now forms BD which is short for BD Cooper. Now that you have been exposed please tell me where you hid the money.

Just kidding. I like it, especially the way you do the base.
 

greerhw

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Boondock confuses me, here in the heartland it's the boondocks, plural. Kind of like the rest of the country feels like where we're located .....;)

Harry
 

Boondock

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Likely story. If you invert the pot it now forms BD which is short for BD Cooper. Now that you have been exposed please tell me where you hid the money.

Just kidding. I like it, especially the way you do the base.
Cooper's money was discovered down on the banks of the Columbia river, just a short drive south of me. ;)
 

Boondock

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Boondock confuses me, here in the heartland it's the boondocks, plural. Kind of like the rest of the country feels like where we're located .....;)

Harry
Boondock is a rare example of a word that entered the American lexicon during WW2. It's from the Tagalog (spoken in the Philippines) word Bundak, which means... mountain.

But we use it to mean any remote, inaccessible place.
 

JasonG

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Cooper's money was discovered down on the banks of the Columbia river, just a short drive south of me. ;)
Very cool pot Dave! I like that.

I caught the last few minutes of a show on the travel channel where they were doing the "25 best lost treasures" and at #1 was Coopers dough! THey suspect it to be in the Washougal river...and there is even a guy who searches almost everyday for it. He has all these models and stuff...it was pretty neat.

Anyways, back to the scooper pot :D
 

Boondock

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here's a better picture of my mark. And look at that sexy texture. I usually include the year as well, but I forgot on this one.

 

milehigh_7

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Normally scoops are not my thing but the with that excellent texture, finish and color I really like it!

Excellent work!
 

TheSteve

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Cooper's money was discovered down on the banks of the Columbia river, just a short drive south of me. ;)
Or like 500 yards from me. Actually he bailed out areound amboy/cougar wa. area. Jason's been to Cougar just doesn't remember it. (Think 5 miles BEFORE the flat tire)
 

Boondock

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Well done Dave! Beautiful texture!!

Is that the Manganese Dioxide wash?
Yes, I have a 5 gallon bucket about half full of the manganese dioxide wash, and I dunk bisqueware in it.. Manganese Dioxide can be tricky, if applied too heavy it turns very dark and shiny. If you've worked with manganese dioxide you know that the oxide does not dissolve in the water, it's held in suspension. So what I do, is give the bucket a good stir, and then wait until it looks right, usually about a minute for the oxide to begin to precipitate (if that's the right word) and fall to the bottom. Then dunk.
 
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Nice scoop, I like scoops and own a few, but none with the "base" yours has. Have you attempted to create a scoop without such an obvious base?



Will
 

Boondock

Shohin
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Very cool pot Dave! I like that.

I caught the last few minutes of a show on the travel channel where they were doing the "25 best lost treasures" and at #1 was Coopers dough! THey suspect it to be in the Washougal river...and there is even a guy who searches almost everyday for it. He has all these models and stuff...it was pretty neat.

Anyways, back to the scooper pot :D
I've stood knee-deep in the Klickitat river, throwing spey flies, which is about 40 miles east, but if I fish the Washougal, I'll keep my eyes open
 
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Boondock

Shohin
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Boon,
When you stain greenware do you bisque prior to the final cone fire?
No, when I apply an oxide wash to greenware, it goes to high fire. Green to cone 6 in one easy step. Using a long ramp firing cycle is preferred when doing this. If I owned my own kiln, I would experiment with this method for one reason, saving electricity. But I probably would only use it for small pots.

However, I have thought about experimenting with brushing an oxide on greenware, and then bisque, and then applying a different oxide, and then high fire. For example, brushing red iron oxide on greenware, then bisque fire, and then dunking in manganese dioxide, then cone 6.

I believe you can bisque fire (cone 06) over and over again.
 
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