Identifying Better collection sites

River's Edge

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I thought it might be helpful for others to see the type of country that collectors look for when seeking high quality Yamadori. I will start off with a group of pictures representing high alpine bog. Exposed to high wind, heavy snow and extreme temperature changes. This is an example from the East Coast of Canada, a Cross Canada 334.JPGhigh plateau in Cape Breton. Although this is a protected site and you cannot collect the trees it has a lot to offer in representing the type of terrain that produce beautiful yamadori. In this case, Larch and Black Spruce primarily.
Perhaps others could post pictures of the type of terrain they like to collect in and what types of trees are found there!
 

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Hartinez

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This looks very similar to an area in Northen NM in Carson national forest. Fields of stunted, weather and animal beaten spruce and fir. I wish I had a good pic to contribute, but come spring, when I’m back in that area I’ll snap a few for sure.
 

River's Edge

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Shallow soil on bedrock, exposed mountain side, affectionately referred to as rock pockets. The disturbed site in the first picture was the location of this sub alpine fir. Located on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Elevation approximately 1500 metres.IMG_0817.JPGPackaged for hike back..jpg
 

andrewiles

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I haven't found any boggy sites south of you that allow collection. In the Olympic NF in Washinton collection is allowed but it's a hike-your-tree-down-the-mountain situation for anything good.

Here are two examples in the NF near Mt. Washington. Both are growing on top of mossy rocks. Stunted due to exposure and summer drought. Sometimes you can just cut one or two long roots and pull the rest of the tree off the rock face. I think these are firs.

PXL_20211019_182612212.jpg PXL_20211019_193130927 (1).jpg

I'd love to run up the coast to Ketchikan and bring a few trees back from the Tongass NF, which allows collection, but I doubt there's any way to do that cost effectively :(. Many areas up there look quite a bit like your first photo.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Residential development in the high desert outside of Palm Springs. Blazing heat and no water in the summer. Freezing cold and high winds in the winter. Don't even need to dig the California junipers... just pick them out of the bulldozer pile.

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Notice the hoof prints in the dry wash. Ranchers/horseback riders in the area do not like California junipers. They consider the deadwood a nuisance or a danger.
 
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rockm

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Love these pics, BUT, they kind of skip past a lot of productive collection sites that aren't nearly as picturesque. Here on the East Coast, things are grittier and less idyllic. Nature can be only part of the equation for decent collectible trees. Vacant lots, old coal mine tips, wooded cul de sacs, community woodlots, abandon orchards, dumps etc. can be great sources of material that has been weathered by trucks, drunken teenagers, cattle and construction equipment.
 

Shogun610

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Near us unless you go to Mountains in Northern/North Central PA or NY for conifers , most by me like 5-10 minutes are gnarled deciduous on side of the road from snow plow, or stunted by farmers cutting them down years ago, old cow pastures , abandoned orchards. It’s a buffet for eastern red cedar, deciduous and flowering deciduous like crabs, apple , pear
 

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hinmo24t

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Love these pics, BUT, they kind of skip past a lot of productive collection sites that aren't nearly as picturesque. Here on the East Coast, things are grittier and less idyllic. Nature can be only part of the equation for decent collectible trees. Vacant lots, old coal mine tips, wooded cul de sacs, community woodlots, abandon orchards, dumps etc. can be great sources of material that has been weathered by trucks, drunken teenagers, cattle and construction equipment.
reminded me of brick-and-mortar shop going bye bye...great material there ive seen a lot of junipers, etc. etc.
not that im condoning taking anything from them. just a lot of empty stores and landscape material to ponder. i live near a mall, barely hanging on

the cul de sacs are a good call. the center circles
 

rockm

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A shout out to my Texas collecting sites. The south offers a lot places that also are hardly pristine alpine slopes, but produce great collection opportunities. This is a pic of such territory. It's near Tyler, Texas near Lake Palestine. The variety of species in this photo, from loblolly pine, cedar elm, four or five kinds of oaks offer loads of potential. The second shot is at ground level. About 90% of that understory growth is cedar elm. all collectible...this is not unusual for the deep south from Texas, La. to Fla.
 

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BrianBay9

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Love these pics, BUT, they kind of skip past a lot of productive collection sites that aren't nearly as picturesque. Here on the East Coast, things are grittier and less idyllic. Nature can be only part of the equation for decent collectible trees. Vacant lots, old coal mine tips, wooded cul de sacs, community woodlots, abandon orchards, dumps etc. can be great sources of material that has been weathered by trucks, drunken teenagers, cattle and construction equipment.

I'd add the right-of-way beneath power transmission lines.
 

rockm

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I'd add the right-of-way beneath power transmission lines.
Don't know about you out there, but here in the east those rights of way under power lines are often the paths that gas, water and fiber optic cables use. Digging there can bring a lot of problems for the digger and the gas/water/cable providers' customers.
 

River's Edge

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Sometimes you can just cut one or two long roots and pull the rest of the tree off the rock face.
One of the best case scenarios, true rock pocket when few anchor roots and mass of feeder roots. You can tell immediately with the movement of the tree when first checked. Hard bedrock better than decomposing rock outcrops. Too many cracks and crevices for roots to extend in the outcrop situation.
but I doubt there's any way to do that cost effectively :(.
Fishing trip! Since when does cost effective apply to fishing!
Rocky Islands exposed to wind, waves, heavy wet snow and ice storms! Also salt spray. typical site for shore pine.IMG_0272.JPG
 

River's Edge

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I haven't found any boggy sites
That may be a blessing in disguise, one of the most difficult areas to successfully collect trees from due to the typical soil compsition and the typical root structure or lack thereof. Technically very difficult with lower success rates for most people.
 

August44

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Love the bogs you have and what they produce. I will look around here for some of those. Good pictures you all are showing. This coming weekend will be my last collecting up high as the snow is working it's way down the Mts
 

River's Edge

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Love these pics, BUT, they kind of skip past a lot of productive collection sites that aren't nearly as picturesque. Here on the East Coast, things are grittier and less idyllic. Nature can be only part of the equation for decent collectible trees. Vacant lots, old coal mine tips, wooded cul de sacs, community woodlots, abandon orchards, dumps etc. can be great sources of material that has been weathered by trucks, drunken teenagers, cattle and construction equipment.
Neighbors to the south in California often find great material in abandoned parking lots, re-development sites in the inner city. I have seen some great junipers salvaged from parking lots in Oakland and San Francisco.
 

River's Edge

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A shout out to my Texas collecting sites. The south offers a lot places that also are hardly pristine alpine slopes, but produce great collection opportunities. This is a pic of such territory. It's near Tyler, Texas near Lake Palestine. The variety of species in this photo, from loblolly pine, cedar elm, four or five kinds of oaks offer loads of potential. The second shot is at ground level. About 90% of that understory growth is cedar elm. all collectible...this is not unusual for the deep south from Texas, La. to Fla.
Areas of sparse growth with challenging conditions are great choices, I imagine the challenge would be deeper roots for survival. Do you practice staged collection with successive trips or take the trees in one go?
 

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