Irish Yew... What to do!..

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Shohin
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OK, so I just brought what I think is an Irish yew (could someone clarify that for me?). I paid £25.00 (labelled at £70.00) because it has not been very well kept. It has got really bad wire marks, made from what was very stiff steel that has rusted over what I think is many years on the tree. Please see pics.

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Rusted steel wire. The thick wires were incredibly difficult to remove.
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Very deep wire marks!!
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Anyway, After nearly 2 hours of unwiring. I have this.
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I am thinking of making 3 trees out of it. The top into a usual s-shaped tree. The middle bit into a cascade, and the right hand side into a windy wonder! Please find other views below.
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I would very much like your opinion on what you would do with tree if it were yours.
 

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Shohin
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It could be. But the yew plum pine needles seem a bit longer. But then again as this tree is looks under developed (very pot bound) it might grow longer needles next year after a re-pot in spring.
 

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Shohin
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I am sure now that it is a Yew Plum Pine (Buddhist Pine), Thanks @BonsaiWilderness I have read 2 totally opposite points of view about overwintering. (We had frosts here last night) one says that they need to be brought into the house. The other says they should stay outside with some winter protection i.e glass/polythene/bubble wrap. Any one know which is correct. Pointers appreciated.
 

leatherback

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I doubt it is a yew.

Check out podocarpus. This would fit with the steel wire, as these often come imported from large chinese nurseries where steel seems to be preferred. (And is left on long enough to rust and/or be partially overgrown)
 

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Podocarpus Macrophyllus... In winter do I keep it warm, Tepid, or shivering!
 

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Shohin
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I have since planted it into a large plastic pot.
 

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this triggered me I suppose.

Once again reason to ditch common names :)
Agreed! What should I do with it in winter? As mentioned I have read two trains of thought. Temps get to about -5 here on average, sometimes colder.
 

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Shohin
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nope. I do not. I cannot control what others say about me, but I have never said that about myself.
Don't be offended. It was a joke my friend. Sometimes my sense of humour doesn't come across on the written word. Thats what the winky emoji was for.
 

leatherback

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Don't be offended. It was a joke my friend. Sometimes my sense of humour doesn't come across on the written word. Thats what the winky emoji was for.
me, offended? nah, just lived in Germany too long.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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I have no personal experience with Podocarpus. But it is pretty commonly grown in North America as bonsai. Outdoors in southern tier of states, and as "indoor bonsai" in the colder areas. Podocarpus is listed as hardy to roughly -5 C, maybe a bit colder. If you bury the pot to the rim, in the ground (heal in) for winter you will probably be okay. Or bring it into an unheated garage or tool shed during the coldest nights. In USA it is grown outdoors through most of Florida,, into southern Georgia and South Carolina.

But again, I have no hands on experience.

The term "Irish yew plum pine" is really misleading, as it could be Taxus, or Cephalotaxus, or Torreya or Podocarpus and or possibly a few other things. AND there are zero Podocarpus native to Ireland. You should really get the nursery to supply you the botanical name. The botanical name refers to a single species no matter which language the speaker uses, where common names do not "translate" across languages. Though I think you are correct that this is Podocarpus macrophylla.

There are nearly a hundred species of Podocarpus, some much more winter hardy than others. It really would be worth checking with the nursery you bought if from to get the correct botanical name for it.
 

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