Just out of the corner of my eye....

Smoke

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I was watching this commercial on the history channel...OK not really watching it but it was on and I was talking and all of a sudden something caught my eye. Thank heavens for DVR's...so I just backed it up, paused it and snapped a picture.

Wouldn't you love just walking along in the forest with a shovel and come across this fellow...just ready to go into a show pot with absolutely no trimming or pruning!

I have no idea on the species but it sure is beautiful. Maybe some kind of Cypress? The water is on the lens of the camera shooting the commercial.
 

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jquast

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I was watching this commercial on the history channel...OK not really watching it but it was on and I was talking and all of a sudden something caught my eye. Thank heavens for DVR's...so I just backed it up, paused it and snapped a picture.

Wouldn't you love just walking along in the forest with a shovel and come across this fellow...just ready to go into a show pot with absolutely no trimming or pruning!

I have no idea on the species but it sure is beautiful. Maybe some kind of Cypress? The water is on the lens of the camera shooting the commercial.
Funny you mentioned this, I thought the same thing when I was watching that episode of Ax Men. Just need to book a trip to Papac island.
 

sean f

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i saw that episode ..there were alot of nice trees all over that island
 

milehigh_7

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Love this Al! You know it makes me think of growing up in Colorado. I did a bunch of backpacking and hiking at and above timberline and I even lived on a ranch complete with thousands of untouched acres of scrub oak, pinyon, juniper and ponderosa.

I did not know of bonsai then but it is why I love bonsai now. The images in my memory of trees in nature pulls me back to bonsai again and again. There is something encouraging about a tree overcoming amazing odds to survive. There is a beauty in the struggle. Same with life I guess...

thanks for sharing
 

jk_lewis

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There is something encouraging about a tree overcoming amazing odds to survive. There is a beauty in the struggle.
And something equally depressing about a bonsaiests' first thought being that he has to dig it up and cart it away, thus robbing the next hiker of that same "encouraging" thought.
 

Bill S

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????Seriously???

Some here feel that way about hunting, it's been shown that many of todays animal counts are higher than they were back in the colonial days. Besides we are talking about hobbiest here, even if you consider the guys that collect and sell it's to a hobbiest for the most part. I realize that deer heards and trees are vastly different, but we aren't even close to the area of having no trees, and how much of a chance do you feel that someone else actually pass the same place a yamadori had been dug. I will say that the place I get larch from I could dig one out every 10' for a mile and no one would ever see the holes if I left them open. From what I know of the UK though it may be a more serious issue, hopefully I am wrong about that. Lots here think that the country has been built out and stripped the land of most things natural, one fly over says thats farrrr from true.

This battle has been going on for years Don, no right answer I think, other than do the right thing for yourself.
Peace.

Bill
 

milehigh_7

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????Seriously???

Some here feel that way about hunting, it's been shown that many of todays animal counts are higher than they were back in the colonial days. Besides we are talking about hobbiest here, even if you consider the guys that collect and sell it's to a hobbiest for the most part. I realize that deer heards and trees are vastly different, but we aren't even close to the area of having no trees, and how much of a chance do you feel that someone else actually pass the same place a yamadori had been dug. I will say that the place I get larch from I could dig one out every 10' for a mile and no one would ever see the holes if I left them open. From what I know of the UK though it may be a more serious issue, hopefully I am wrong about that. Lots here think that the country has been built out and stripped the land of most things natural, one fly over says thats farrrr from true.

This battle has been going on for years Don, no right answer I think, other than do the right thing for yourself.
Peace.

Bill

Along that line, my mother in law's cabin is on the only road into BLM land so between her 500 or so wooded acres and the otherwise inaccessible 50 square miles or so behind her land I would say there are a few trees.
 

Vance Wood

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And something equally depressing about a bonsaiests' first thought being that he has to dig it up and cart it away, thus robbing the next hiker of that same "encouraging" thought.
What are the odds that the next hiker, unless he/she is a bonsaiist, will think in this way about this tree or even notice it at all? The next hiker may look at this tree and decide it to be good fire wood for his camp fire.

On the other side of the coin if someone who knows what they are doing were able to harvest this tree and successfully develop it into a bonsai then many more people would be able to look at this tree and appreciate it for the same reasons. This is how bonsai started in the first place.
 
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