mume seeds what next?

grizzlywon

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I collected quite a few prumus mume fruit last weekend and wanted to know what to do next. One friend said to get the pulp/fruit off and then plant out right now.

Any other advice? Should they be soaked first and treated with some fungicide?

I also collected some Bradford pear fruit and a small cherry. I have planted these out before but would be open to advice on these too.

Tks!
 

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jk_lewis

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Well, Ma Nature doesn't get rid of the pulp and treat with a fungicide, does she? The fruit drops, the pulp decomposes, and the seed sprouts in the spring. Prunus mume requires a brief cold stratification, but I suspect winters are cold enough in Fresno for that to be OK. But if you are in a hurry, a week or two in the fridge at under 40 degrees in a plastic bag with some damp paper towel may be necessary.
 

grizzlywon

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jkl. I'm looking for the best way to do this not just a way. From what I know, Nature makes sure that just enough germinate, not all, I'd like almost all to. Also, I live in an area where we don't have much of a winter. Maybe a couple days of freezing weather.

I also don't really want the pulp on them so I won't have opossums, rats, or cats digging up my seedbeds.

I was hoping people on here who plant them out would guide me.

Not trying to be a jerk, but there are reasons why people stratify seeds instead of just trusting nature. It works better.
 

Brent

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I've had pretty good germination rates on mume by doing the following: First, I add enough water to cover the fruit and then just let them sit outside and ferment, takes about a week or two. This helps get the pulp off easily and provides them with way to break the first germination inhibitor (if there is one). After they are very clean from multiple washing and rinsing with clear water, I let them sit in a collander until they stop dripping. Then I store them until the following spring in the fridge like I do with all my seed. I add an equal volume of DRY vermiculite, mix well and store in a sealed zip lock bag. If the seed is still wet when you do this, you will not have to add more water and you will get little or no mold. Sow in the spring when you are sure they won't freeze, or earlier if you have a greenhouse.

Brent
EvergreenGardenworks.com
 

grizzlywon

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Brent, thanks so much. You have helped me in the past on maple seedlings and by following your instructions on them I have had great success. And have a 4 seedbeds right now full of maples to show for it!

I'll will follow your instructions but have also heard that I could even plant some out right now and get decent results this year. Am I wrong? I know there would be no benefit of stratification, but could add almost a year of growth if true.
 

Brent

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Since it's too cold here for the almost year round growing that you can get there, I have no experience in doing what you suggest. I doubt that they have NO cold treatment requirement. I would give them at least 30 days, then sow.

Brent
 

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