My Kotobuki

discusmike

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This looks alot like a kotobuki on Dons website for sale awhile back,very nice,i see it back buded well.
 

discusmike

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How tall is the tree Duane?any idea of how old it might be?
 

Just Duane

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Yes

You're absolutely correct Mike, I got the tree from Don Blackmond of http://gregorybeachbonsai.com/

Dons best guestimate of the trees age is between 45-55 yrs old. I'm very happy with the tree & would like to thank Don for his excellent service & patience. I also want to say that the tree arrived with not a single candle broken.
 

Just Duane

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Hey Chris Johnston, I did it

This is my first time candling & pulling needles on this tree since I got it from Don Blackmond.

Shot this before candling & pulling needles



Shot this after candling & pulling needles.



Suggestion or comments always welcomed.
 

greerhw

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This is my first time candling & pulling needles on this tree since I got it from Don Blackmond.

Shot this before candling & pulling needles



Shot this after candling & pulling needles.



Suggestion or comments always welcomed.
Don is a straight shooter, nice work on the Buki.
I do have a question though, how do you plan on giving the tree a rest and some cold weather in your climate.

keep it green,
Harry
 

Just Duane

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Hello Harry. I honestly will be trying the refrigerator thing. I never really worried about my other jbps, but i've never had one in this caliber or age. I read on Brents blog that this is possible. I will bring this tree to my clubs meeting at the end of the month & ask for consultation on the refigerator thing.
 
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Beautiful tree. Good luck with it. I'd be thinking about taking about 1/3 off the top and forming a new one. It just looks too tall for the width and diameter of the trunk.
 

Just Duane

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Frank, im not sure, ive never tried it. Maybe someone who tried the refrigerator thing can chime in



Mac, thanks for the suggestion
 

amkhalid

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I haven't tried it, and don't know anyone who has personally.

But I do know it can be done in some cases, as I've heard of some club in the south (St. Louis?) who bought a giant freezer to keep larch. Can't give you any more details than that though because this is all word of mouth.

I know this is out of my realm, but two things that I would be thinking about if I were in your position... first, getting the tree dormant/approaching dormancy before putting it in the fridge. In St. Louis, I would imagine it gets cold enough to at least initiate dormancy before it goes into the deep freeze. Is the same true for you? If the tree is not dormant before putting it in the fridge, it will still be photosynthesizing and I would guess it will freak out in the immediate switch to pitch black. If it is dormant before you put it in, the darkness won't be a problem. The second thing I would worry about is the lack of humidity in the fridge, which will also present a very abrupt change to the tree. But thats probably not a big deal.

Just some food for thought. Obviously what I am ranting about here is pretty meaningless compared to what your club members will tell you. Beautiful tree, please keep us posted on the overwintering, I find this really interesting!
 

rockm

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AM brings up very valid points. I would be very careful in committing such a tree to a refrigerator-induced coma.

The whole problem with "refrigerator dormancy" is that is artificially induced and sustained, which leaves open all sorts of things that can go wrong.

Natural dormancy is not triggered by temperature, but by daylight length. Preparation for dormancy begins just after the summer solstice, as days start getting shorter. It's a lengthy process that culminates in a dormant tree.

Simply plunking a tree in a refrigerator will stop its growth, but mostly by shocking the tree into it--if the tree hasn't had adequate preparation.

The issue of humidity is not a trivial one. Refrigerated air dries things out rapidly. Elevating humidity in darkness is a great way to grow mold...

Talk to someone who has done this REPEATEDLY AND SUCCESSFULLY with their trees. Don't rely on what you've heard third hand.
 

amkhalid

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I read on Brents blog that this is possible.
Can you post a link to this blog post? I would be very interesting in reading it. I tried to find it on his blog but couldn't... there doesn't seem to be a search option.

Cheers

Edit: nevermind I think I found it here. Here is what I read, just for the sake of discussion. Interesting, Brent says you can even just stick them right in the fridge without any preparation... but that is not ideal.

How to Give Plants a Dormant Period From Evergreen Gardenworks

It is not easy, but some people have become adept at growing temperate plants indoors by giving them a dormant period each year. This can be done by keeping plants in the refrigerator, in a cold garage, or outside until the dormancy requirements are met. The plants are then brought back into the house and growth is reinitiated by providing warmer temperatures and increased daylength with grow lights. This is not a procedure for beginners, and if you wish to try it, expect failures until you learn the proper techniques and the eccentricities of each species.

If, for some reason, you cannot keep your temperate plants outside all winter to give them a dormant period, here is how you can do it can do it in the refrigerator: First (if possible), keep them outside and let them enjoy a few light frosts. Ideally, four to six weeks of decreasing day length and mild cool weather where the temps are around 25 to 35F at night, will adequately prepare them. If this is not possible, just keep them as cool as possible as late as possible in the fall, and then put them in the fridge. The above preparation is not strictly necesary, but it does keep them healthier and minimizes the refrigerator period. Going directly from a growing state (AFTER a full season of growth) into cold storage will not adversely affect any temperate climate plant. They will just go dormant in the fridge, drop their leaves, etc.

Some precaution against drying out in the fridge must be taken, especially in modern frost free refrigerators. You can wrap them loosely with plastic, but do allow some circulation. Take them out weekly and check to see if they need watering. They still must be watered normally when they begin to dry out. Light is not necessary as long as the temperature is low, about 35F or lower. If you have the option, keep the temperature hovering just above freezing, it will minimize fungal problems.

As a minimum, keep them in the fridge for six weeks, longer is fine. After six weeks, they will have the 1000 hours of chill considered necessary for most temperate climate plants. You can then take them out and return them to growing conditions. This may be inside, but please read the articles on growing indoors. This will almost certainly mean good air circulation, grow lights, and added humidity such as a growing chamber or small greenhouse.

In the beginning, it is far more important to learn how to properly water, prune, fertilize, and repot your tropical bonsai than it is try to manipulate the dormant period of temperate climate species.
 
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Just Duane

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Thanks guys, i'll see what my club says about the refrigerator thing. (i have a feeling i'm going to get laughed at!:)
 

Shima

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You'll notice Brent is referring to deciduous trees which are dormant after leaf fall, it's quite another thing with pines. I wouldn't do it.
 

shohin kid

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as I've heard of some club in the south (St. Louis?) who bought a giant freezer to keep larch.
In St. Louis, I would imagine it gets cold enough to at least initiate dormancy before it goes into the deep freeze.
It has gotten to -5F to -10F here in St. louis, so I don't think people here do the refrigerator thing.
 

Just Duane

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No fridge needed!

Ok, I got to consult with my sensei & other club members about putting this jbp in the fridge. I was pleased that I didn't get laughed at (least not while i was looking).
This is what I was told. My tree will either adapt to our climate or die! Most jbps in Hawaii were either raised here or propagated here & they have acclimated to our weather. My tree was not raised here & will need a season or two to fully acclimate. Jbps are tough trees & will try its best to survive in all conditions. In Hawaii, jbps grow all year long with no ill effects. We have jbps that have been grown here for 30, 40 50 years & are still very healthy & beautiful.
So, its time to say a little prayer & hopefully, my tree will acclimate & thrive!
Thanks to all for your comments & suggestions.
 
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